University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Memorandum from the Federal Republic of Germany to the Soviet Union, on German reunification and European security, September 2, 1956,   pp. 191-200 PDF (4.6 MB)


Page 192

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY) 1944-59
that the question of the re-establishment of the national unity
of a democratic Germany was and remained the main issue con-
fronting the German people, an issue in the settlement of which
every peace-loving people in the whole of Europe is interested.
In its note of 15 August 1953, to the Governments of France, the
United Kingdom, and the United States, in which it expressed the
same conviction, the Soviet Government furthermore stated the
following:
No excuses whatsoever can justify any further delay in this matter,
since, in the present circumstances, the Governments of France,
Great Britain, the United States, and the U.S.S.R., bear the main
responsibility for arriving at a solution. On no account must
any measures be postponed which-and even if they be merely
aimed at a gradual solution of the problem of the reunification of
Germany-can promote the formation of an all-German Demo-
cratic Government.
The Federal Government is unable to perceive any reason which
might cause the Soviet Government to change its views on the urgency
of the problem of reunification. The Federal Government is, for its
part, of the opinion that each one of the reasons which at the time con-
vinced the Soviet Government of the urgency of the question con-
tinues to exist at present-in fact, in greater measure. In its note of
10 March 1952, to the Governments of France, the United Kingdom,
and the United States, the Soviet Government itself said it was abnor-
mal that seven years had already elapsed since the cessation of hostili-
ties without any peace treaty having been concluded with Germany.
Meanwhile, this abnormality has now continued for eleven years. In
its note of 9 April 1952, to the Governments of France, the United
Kingdom, and the United States, the Soviet Government even men-
tioned the fact that the continued partition of Germany entailed the
danger of an outbreak of hostilities in Europe. The Federal Govern-
ment shares the view expressed by the Soviet Government at that time
that any continuation of the partition of Germany represents a serious
international danger. Even though a certain improvement is happily
apparent in the situation in comparison with the acute international
tension which still existed in 1952, there can be no doubt that any
pacification of Europe calls for a solution to the problem of German
reunification and accordingly the removal of the dangers inherent in
the partition of Germany. The Soviet Union has repeatedly stated
that it is the honest intention of Soviet foreign policy to secure world
peace and to bring about a lasting order in Europe offering all
nations security, liberty, and prosperity. On the other hand, the un-
necessary prolongation by the Soviet Government of the partition of
Germany by its assertion, contrary to the views of an overwhelming
majority of the other countries in the world, of the existence of two
German States, seems to the Federal Republic incompatible with these
intentions.
3) The Federal Government points out with satisfaction that, with
regard to the legal situation, there is agreement: when the Four
Powers assumed the governmental power on the cessation of hos-
tilities, they undertook the obligation to maintain Germany as a
whole. During the time that followed, they have repeatedly admitted
this legal obligation and their moral responsibility for the reestab-
.


Go up to Top of Page