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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Report of agent in Minnesota,   pp. 275-279 PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 276

276 
REPORT OF AGENT IN MINNESOTA. 
might justly have been expected of them, owing to certain influences, which
in 
a nieasurI tended to confuse the Indian mind, and which always lead to more
or 
less councilig, dancing and neglect of work, although this was discouraged
by the agent and his employds in every possible way. 
The following statementof the numb-r of acres under cultivation and estimate
of crops raised by the Indians of the White Earth Reservation is respectfully
submitted: 
No. acres  Estimated 
Kind of crop.                        under cul-   crop. 
tivation. 
Bushels. 
W he t (t 1  b shes)  ..................................... 5,16  77, 790
W heat  (at  15  bushels)  ----------------------------------------------------
 1,750  70,000 
Oats (at 40 bushels) ------------------------------------------------ 370
  10, 100 
Barley and rye (at 30 bushels) -----------96                            
     4, 800 
C orn  (at  50  bushels)  ------------------------------------------------------
 91   4,800 
Potatoes (at 50 bushels) -. .. . .. .. . ..-- ---------------------------------
 314  15,700 
T u rn ip s  an d  ru tab ag as  .........................................
--7  510 
Onions (at 30 busbels) --------------------------------------------------
 7 494 
Other vegetables ----------------------------------------------------- 
Total -------------------------------------------------------------  8,269
 182,000 
Number of acres broken, 718. Rods of fence made this year, 13,880. 
Removals--There have been removed from other reservations to che White 
Earth Reservation, during the past two years, 428 Indians, nearly all of
whom 
have been located on their allotments, making the total population of White
Earth Reservation at present 2,538. 
Eaducation.-The schools have all been in successful operation the past year.
The schools at Pine Point and Wild Rice River were formerly under contract,
but'were transferred to the control of the Indian Bureau as Government schools
March 1, 1892.    The remaining contract schools are St. Benedict's Orphan
School at White Ea-th and St. Mary's School at Red Lake Reservation. The
aggregate enrollment was 5.52 pupils, with an average attendance of 425,
besides 
these there were 120 pupils in Fort Totten, Lincoln, Carlisle, and Collegevill
. 
The attendance in detail is given below. (See reports of the different superin-
tendents.) 
Number AveragNumber Amount 
Number Averag   of     of funds 
of attend-   otsepne 
Schools.                     pupils auce for man-   by Gov- 
enrolled, the year. tained. erment. 
Government:                                                  9C 
White Earth-------------------------------------  135    9G      10   $10,550.53
R ed   L ake  ---------------------------------. --. -----.....  60  40 
10  5,262.41 
Leech Lake .......................................... "  54  49   10
  5,671.41 
Wl e ke--------------------------------------  72    40       4    1,940.21
Pine  Point* -----------------------              45      30       4    1,
T26.73 
Wild Rice River........................251451.29 
onrc:120                                       115      10|     ±27.00
Contract: 
St. Benedict's Orphan, White Earth ------------------12           10    
t27. 00 
St. Mary's, Red Lake ------------------------------- 91  52      60     
i27.00 
Wild Rice River, White Earth* -----------------------9    1       6     
t27. 0 
Pine Point, White Earth* ---------------------------- 13   1            
  27.00 
Cass Lake, Cass Lake ................................. 
* These were Government schools from March 1, 1892. 
t Per contract, $27 per capita. 
Population.-The following table is respectfully submitted in compliance with
information desired. The table shows a slight increase in numbers over the
previous census, from additions to the rolls of sundry persons, forgotten
in past 
censuses, but who have succeeded in establishing their claims. Otherwise
this 
tribe seems to be at a stand, the deaths about equaling the births. 


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