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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Report of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes,   pp. 579-640 PDF (26.6 MB)


Page 639

FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 
639 
Statement of disbursements, fiscal year 1905, Commission to the Five Civilized
Tribes. 
Salaries of Commissioners .. 
Salaries of employees, regular and irregu- 
la r   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - --- - - ---- - - -
--- - - - - 
Traveling expenses of Commissioners and 
employees ---- 
Open-market purchases: Typewriters, 
horses, furniture, rubber stamps, docu- 
ment files, etc., for general office, land 
offices, and field parties - --- 
Contract purchases: Chamois skins ..... 
Freight and express charges ........... 
Printing, binding, and stationery in open 
market and from Department ------------ 
Subsistence: Employees of field parties --- 
Forage: Stock of headquarters and field 
parties 
Rent: 
General offices, Muskogee 
Land offices outside of Muskogee ------- 
Stock  corral  ------------------------------ 
Telegraphing ................................. 
Telephone service -------------------------- 
Electric lighting: General offices and land 
offices.       . 
Ferriage and bridge toll of field parties .... 
Repai.rs of typewriters, wagons, camp 
equipm ent,  etc  ----------------------------- 
W itness  fees ---------------------------------- 
Registering letters and packages -    -- 
Incidental expenses: Ice, coal oil, stock 
medicine, soap, fuel, etc -- 
Miscellaneous expenses: Street sprinkling, 
repairing electric lights, etc_ 
T o ta l  - -- - - ----- - --- - --- - - ---- - - ---- - - ---- 
First 
quarter. 
$2,500.00 
59,043.36 
728.90 
1, 918.37 
154.24 
1,388.12 
1,020.21 
292.22 
942.00 
900.00 
75.00 
68.86 
55.75 
50.89 
1.15 
192.37 
----------- 
227.24 
80.02 
83.55 
Second 
quarter. 
$5,000.00 
59,277.84 
1,357.28 
1,056.77 
6.00 
109.06 
1,692.30 
732.88 
339.73 
900.00 
700.00 
75.00 
61.51 
62.30 
85.91 
----------- 
207.89 
3.96 
300.88 
127.87 
224.32 
6972. 25  72,321.501 
Third 
quarter. 
$3,750.00 
58,767.75 
2,650.62 
1,804.38 
125.89 
2,035.78 
750.54 
399.68 
1,3-35.64 
958.60 
75.00 
73.61 
20.00 
134.11 
4.50 
f76. 45 
----------- 
294.48 
117.63 
116. 73 
73,631.39 
Fourth 
quarter. 
$3, 750.00 
63,071.23 
4,020.84 
Total. 
$15,000.00 
240,160.18 
8,757.64 
1,971.15   6,750.67 
............ 6.00 
260.43     649.62 
4,425.45   9,541.65 
628.91   3,132.54 
364.99   1,396.62 
1,235.00   4,412.64 
685.48   3,244.08 
75.00     300.00 
78.00     281.98 
104.90    242.95 
91.45     362.36 
1.90       7.55 
459.56   1,136.27 
13.00      16.96 
246.80   1,039.40 
58.12     383.64 
166.94     591.54 
81,709.15  297,444.29 
CONCLUSION. 
In this, the last official communication of the Commission to the 
Five Civilized Tribes, it is not possible, of course, to report the com-
pletion of such work as is carried over by operation of law, or of all 
of the new work imposed during the last session of Congress. Indeed, 
there are many things which can not, under the law, be done at this 
time. For example, final allotment of lands to the Mississippi Choc- 
taws can not be made until they have lived upon their allotment 
selections for a period of three years. The work in connection with 
allotment contest cases must necessarily go on for a considerable 
time. A work such as that which the Commission has performed in 
Indian Territory must necessarily give rise to matters requiring the 
attention and supervision of the Interior Department for an indefi- 
nite period. -But the necessity for the Commission has disappeared, 
and it may be said to have accomplished the purposes for which it 
was created. 
Its first duty was to negotiate agreements looking to the dissolu- 
tion of the tribal governments and the transfer of land titles from the 
tribes as communities to the individual Indians. The agreements 
made between the Commission and the several tribes, as ratified by 
Congress and by popular vote of the Indians, form the basis upon 
which the plans of the Government have been carried out. It was 
considered by some that when the agreements had been consummated 


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