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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Nevada,   pp. 254-260 PDF (3.5 MB)


Page 256

256     REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
After many years' consideration a day school has been authorized at old Fort
McDermitt, in the extreme northern part of Nevada. As there are plenty of
children there for a school, and the Indians seem very anxious for it, we
should 
be able to maintain an excellent day school in the old military buildings
that can 
be fitted up for the purpose. 
The question of establishing day schools at various other points in this
local- 
ity has been considered, but it does not seem advisable to begin their erection
at 
present. 
C. H. ASBURY, Superintendent. 
REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL TEACHER IN CHARGE OF PAIUTE ON MOAPA RIVER RESERVA-
TION. 
MOAPA, NEV., August 10, 1905. 
This reservation is located on the Moapa River in southeastern Nevada and
on the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, 2  miles from depot,
396 miles from Salt Lake City, and 384 miles from Los Angeles, Cal. It con-
tains about 1,100 acres, about 600 of which is good agricultural land, and
plenty 
of water for it. 
Progress of these Paiute Indians in agricultural pursuits the past two years
has been limited because of much intoxication among them. Since July 14,
1905, there have been no drunken Indians on or off the reservation because
of 
the prosecution and conviction of one Mrs. J. W. McKenna at Carson City,
Nev., 
on August 4, 1905, for selling whisky to Indians at or near Moapa in July,
1904. 
Mrs. J. W. McKenna is now behind the prison bars serving time. This was a
noted and very hard fought case at an expense to the Government of about
$3,000. I left here July 7 with six Indian witnesses and was gone thirty-three
days, returning August 9, 1905. 
Health.-The general health of the Indians is pretty good, though there has
been several deaths since my last report, being mostly of old age; but five
births, 
I suppose on account of so much disease among them. 
Population.-Estimated on and off the reservation: 
Children between 6 and 16: Males, 15; females, 16------------31 
Children under 6 years of age: Males, 7; females, 8-------- 15 
Indians over 20: Males, 45; females, 45---------------------90 
Total---------------------------------------------136 
Education.-School was opened the 1st November last with a small attend- 
ance, the average being about 13 for the balance of the year to May 31, at
which time we closed school. 
Suicide.-One Indian, named Jerry, committed suicide by cutting his throat
with his pocket knife. About three years ago two young Indians enticed Jerry's
son, a bright young Indian, to St. Thomas, and while asleep they knocked
him 
in the head with a big iron, killing him. Since that time Jerry has seemed
demented at times. 
A killing occurred at Hiko August 8, 1905. One Paiute Indian stabbed an-
other one in the heart, killing him instantly. Almost immediately two other
Indians shot this Indian four times, once under the ear, once in the jaw,
and 
twice under the arm; all Paiute Indians. No arrests have been made yet. 
The Indians appear to be quite different since the whisky has been cut off
from them. 
WILLIAM C. SHARP, 
Industrial Teacher in Charge and Special Disbursing Agent. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF NEVADA AGENCY. 
WADSWORTH, NEV., September 18, 1905. 
The Nevada Agency embraces about 320,000 acres of land, mostly desert, and
includes within its boundary lines Pyramid Lake, a large body of water, 
nearly 45 miles in length and having an average width of 12 miles. Salmon


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