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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in California,   pp. 180-195 PDF (7.8 MB)


Page 190

190     REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
until for many years past they have been little more than a drunken debauch.
Instead of undertaking to break up the fiesta, I have tried to make it respect-
able and bring it back to the original intention of making it a religious
feast. 
The drinking has been practically broken up. There is still too much gambling,
but "one thing at a time" is the surest way to succeed. With the
stopping of 
the drinking more interest in the religious feature is apparent. 
All police are required to attend each fiesta, and they are very diligent
in pre- 
serving order and preventing the introduction of intoxicating liquors. I
can not 
speak too highly of these faithful men. The sentiment of the Indians is fast
becoming opposed to these excesses. Fiestas held this year have been remark-
ably orderly; in fact, much more so than similar gatherings among the whites.
The Campo situation.-In November, 1903, I called the attention of the office
to the destitution at the Campo, La Posta, Manzanita, Laguna, and Cuyapipa
reservations and made recommendations looking to the relief of these people.
Since that time much has been done for them. The old and indigent have been
provided for, a field matron and an assistant field matron have been placed
in 
that field, a small school established, with the result that the people are
gaining 
self-respect and are now looking forward to a time when they will be able
to 
help themselves without the aid of anyone. It seems to me that there is but
one 
solution to the Indian question in this district, and that is to purchase
suitable 
lands for them, build them comfortable houses, provide them with some simple
agricultural implements, and require them to earn their own living. They
are 
not lazy, but the land they have is so nearly wothless that a living by farming
is out of the question. 
During the great destitution last winter there were many donations of food,
money, and clothing from charitable persons and societies. The people of
San 
Diego also furnished them with seed grain for the spring planting. For all
of 
these I am very thankful. 
Population.-A census taken at the close of the fiscal year shows the follow-
ing: 
Total population: (Males, 876; females, 778) 1,654; children, ages 6 to 18
(males 233; females, 196), 429; births, 35; deaths, 31. 
I am very much encouraged. These Indians in general are quiet, peaceable,
and law-abiding. While it is true that there are some among them who love
to 
make mischief, the majority are tractable and really good citizens. This
good 
element is dominant, and little trouble comes from the evil disposed. 
CHARLES E. SHELL, 
Superintendent and Special Disbursing Agent. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF MISSION INDIANS. 
SAN JACINTO, CAL., September 1, 1905. 
The revised census rolls show that the population varies but slightly from
that 
of last year. The appended table will inform you as to- our Indian population,
and is presented as the most compact means of referen0e: 
Reservations. 
* t t 
-c            C3 C3   c 
Population-----------------------154  51 144  279  33 141  55  52  342 1,251
Males                          87  28   74  145  19  69   36  26  190  674
Females..---------------------67   23   70  134  14  72   19  26 152   577
Malesover1        .            56  21   52  83   16  52   26  14  137  457
Males under18.......------------------31  7  22  62  3  17  10  12  53  217
Females over 14 ..................... 41  19  49  88,  13  51  14  16  118
 408 
Females under 18--------------------26  8  27  59  3  24  5  12  42  206
Between 6 and16 -.-----------------33  8  27  67  4  26  8  12   71  256
Males between 6 and16--------------17  4  14  33  2  10   5   5   40  130
Femaleshbetween 6and16-------16     4   13  34    2  16    3   -7- 31  126
Marriages --------3 2-2------------      ------ 2  2       1    1    9 
Dets1                      2    4   5        7...         10'  31 
Births----------------------..........5  2  4I  3/ 1..       6-         21
alncluding Martinez, Torres, Alimo Bonito, Agua Dulce, and Cabazon. 


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