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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, on German reunification and European security, October 10, 1956,   pp. 201-202 PDF (929.3 KB)


Page 201

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 19 4 4-5 9
The Government of the United States- fully shares the Federal
Government's view that it is incumbent upon the- four powers to ful-
fill the task undertaken by them in the directive issued by the Heads
of Government at Geneva in July 1955 for the reunification of Ger-
many by means of free elections carried out in conformity with the
national interests of the German people and the interests of European
security. This is a task which, as the note of the Federal Govern-
ment points out, cannot be adequately fulfilled "by mere assent to the
principle of reunification, without any agreements being reached re-
garding practical ways and means of realizing it."
The achievement of German reunification in freedom is a funda-
mental goal of United States policy. Together with the governments
of France and the United Kingdom, the Government of the United
States put forward proposals at the Geneva meeting of Foreign Min-
isters in 1955 for the reunification of Germany by free elections and
for a treaty of asurance giving the Soviet Union far-reaching se-
curity safeguards when Germany was reunified. So far, however,
the Soviet Government has refused to discuss these proposals. The
Government of the United States nevertheless continues to hope that
the Soviet Government will fulfill its responsibilities in accordance
with the agreement reached by the Heads of Government. For its
part, the Government of the United States will not cease to pursue
its efforts to achieve the reunification of Germany, the continued
division of which constitutes a grave injustice to the German people
and makes impossible the establishment of a basis for lasting peace
and security in Europe.
To this end, the Government of the United States welcomes the
initiative taken by the Federal Government and shares the desire set
forth in the latter's memorandum that it may lead to an exchange
of views which might promote agreement among the Four Powers
on reunification, as well as on a sound system of European security,
which can be achieved only if Germany is reunited.
In transmitting to the Soviet Government a copy of its reply to the
note of the Federal Government, the Government of the United States
is conveying the hope that the Soviet Government will respond to the
initiative of the Federal Government in such a way that the Four
Powers may be able to give effect to the agreement made at Geneva
to achieve the reunification of Germany by means of free elections.
Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry,
on German Reunification and European Security, October 10,
1956'1
The Government of the United States of America presents its com-
pliments to the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
and has the honor to refer to the memorandum which was addressed
to the Soviet Government on the second of September by the Govern-
ment of the Federal Republic of Germany and of which a copy was
sent to the Government of the United States. The Government of the
United States now has the honor to transmit to the Soviet Government
1Department of State press release 531, October 10, 19i58 The United Kingdom
and
France sent identical notes on the same day.
201


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