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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in Wisconsin,   pp. 512-521 PDF (4.7 MB)


Page 512

512             REPORTS OF AGENTS IN WISCONSIN. 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN WISCONSIN. 
REPORT OF GREEN BAY AGENCY. 
GREEN BAY AGENCY, 
Keshena, Wis., August 31, 1892. 
SIR: In obedience to instructions and official regulations, the following
report 
of affairs and occurrences at this agency for the year ending June 30, 1892,
is 
resyectfully submitted: 
Location.-The Oneida Reservation, containing 65,540 acres, situated between
the counties of Brown and Outagamie; the Menomonee Reservation, consisting
of 10 townships of land (3 of which are in Oconto County and 7 in Shawano
County); and the Stockbridge Reservation, containing 18 sections of land
ad- 
joining the Menomonee Res ervation in Shawano County, form the territory
con- 
stituting the Green Bay Agency. The agency office is at Keshena, 8 miles
from 
the railway station in Shawano. 
Oneida Indians.-Allotments of land in severalty to Oneida Indians were prac-
tically completed when I took charge of the agency a little more than two
years 
ago, but the announcement of official approval has not yet been made. The
Oneidas are well advanced in civilization, many of them possessing good farms
and buildings, using improved machinery, and having comfortable surround-
ings and appliances in their homes equal to their white neighbbrs off the
res- 
ervation. Some members of this tribe are also very poor, living precariously
in badly conditioned cabins, with little hope of improvement. 
A large number of children have been taken from this reservation to different
Government training schools, more than 300 having been in such schools during
the past year. Upon this reservation, on land set apart for a school farm,
two 
brick buildings are in process of construction for use as a Government school,
with the expectation that such school will be opened for pupils this fall.
Six 
day schools are maintained by the Government. 
Upon this reservation there are three church buildings: A large stone edifice
erected a number of years ago by Episcopalians, a new and large edifice of
wood, 
nearly complete, by the Methodist denomination, and a smaller one by Roman
Catholics. 
The Stockbridge Indians had land allotted to them in severalty in 1874, which
al- 
lotments seem never to have been perfected to the extent of placing each
allot- 
tee in possession of his own allotment. Conflicting claims under treaties
and 
acts of Congress appear to have kept these people in a state of unrest for
quite a 
number of years, and little progress is visible in the development of farms.
There 
is no church upon this reservation, but religious services have been held
a large 
portion of the time in their schoolhouse, conducted chiefly by Congregational
missionaries. A school is maintained at an annual expense for a teacher of
$500 
from the annuity of the tribe. 
In my opinion these people are as nearly civilized as they are likely to
become 
in another score of years-with present surroundings, and as well qualified
to 
take care of themselves as they will be if their land is deeded to them in
fee 
simple. 
Menomonee Indians.-Upon the Menomonee Reservation there are no schools 
other than the Government boarding school, with a capacity for accommodating
150 pupils, and the Catholic contract school, with accommodations for about
the 
same number of children. 
One new building, 40 by 72 feet, two stories high besides the basement, has
been completed during the past year, adding largely to the convenience as
well 
as increase of accommodations at the Government school. Also, an addition
of 
36 feet to the main building for larger laundry, bathroom, and room for baking
oven, are valuable improvements. The main Government school building has
for two winters been warmed by steam, proving much more satisfactory than
the 
former method by use of stoves. The new building was designed for steam heat-
ing, but apparatus has not been ordered. In connection with these buildings
there are three wells; one of them for a wind motor, pumping water to a 75-barrel
tank over the laundry ; another is for a power pump with hose, as a protection
in case of fire. 
There has also been erected a good building, 40 by 60 feet, two stories,
and 
warmed by steam, for use as a hospital for the sick among Menomonee Indians,
which proves very satisfactory in all respects. 
The Menomonees have a good roller process fiouring mill, at which flour is
manufactured for school and agency use as well as grist o'rinding for member.


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