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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1879
([1879])

Reports of agents in Wisconsin,   pp. 159-166 PDF (3.6 MB)


Page 159

.REPORTS OF AGENTS IN WISCONSIN. 
-159 
SHOPS. 
The shops of the agency have been supplied with tools and material, so as
to make 
each department thrifty. We instruct apprentices in all the shops and mills.
HOSPITAL. 
The hospital suffkred inconvenience from the delay of the medicinei-not being
re- 
ceived for six months after they were purchased. The general health of the
Indians 
has been better this year than in years past. The children are becoming healthier;
fewer deaths, and more births. 
The Indiansof the agency have generally been orderly, and increasingly industrious
the 
past year. A very great effort has-been made by some of the whites outside
of the agency 
to get the Indians to renounce their tribal relation and leave the reserve
and take land 
outside. This is done by evil and designing men, who are using every means
and 
measure to break up the reservation, so it may be thrown open to the whites
and the 
Indians driven to parts unknown. 1 repeat, what in substance I have said
before, the 
great want of the service is not more money, soldiers, or police, to keep
order, to make 
the Indians of the nation quiet and self-supporting, but practical business,
Christian men 
in every department, that can govern and instruct, by precept and example,
how to work 
and how to live. Educate them to till the soil, make them mechanics, develop
their 
muscles in holding the plow, splitting rails, making fence, chopping wood,
and all 
kinds of work done in civilized life. 
My acquaintance with the Indians of this coast for thirty-two years, and
having 
charge of this agency (with the exception of eighteen months) since September,
1864, 
I speak understandingly when I say the Indians of the nation may be made
self-support- 
ing; keep them separate and distinct from the whites, in possession of good
land, with 
a title to the same-extending the laws of the United States over them-punishing
them for their crimes and giving them an opportunity of testifying in our
courts, so 
their wrongs may be redressed and justice may be administered. 
I have the honor to report the refundinfrta the United States Treasury at
the end of 
this fiscal year an unexpended balance of $8,214.59. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 
JAMES H. WILBUR, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
4        GREEN BAY AGENCY, 
KESHENA, SIAWANO COUNTY, WISCONSIN, 
8eptember 1, 1879. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my first annual report of affairs
of this 
agency. 
POPULATION. 
The number of Indians by tribes at the last enrallment was: Onedias, 1,470;
Meao- 
monees, 1,460; Stockbridges, 120-total 3,050. 
THE ONEIDAS 
are head and shoulders ahead of fhe other tribes in agricultural pursuits;
they are 
self-supporting and entirely dependent upon their own industry for their
subsistence, 
their annuities from the government amounting to only about 68 cents per
capita per 
annum. Many of them have some of the finest farms in Northern Wisconsin and
raise 
large and valuable crops. What is particularly desired by them is the 
Allotment of lands, 
which would be a great incenti'e to them to further industry in agricultural
pur- 
suits. 
Schools. 
They have four schools on the reservation that are well attended. One is
taught by 
Rev. E. A. Goodnough, an Episcopal missionary; the second, by Rev.S. W. Ford,
a Meth- 


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