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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1864
([1864])

New Mexico superintendency,   pp. 180-216 PDF (15.6 MB)


Page 180

180 
NEW MEXICO SUPERINTENDENCY. 
his own, and that my efforts should be directed to promoting the best interest
of the citizens of Utah and the Indians, by preserving the peace within my
dis- 
trict by the policy suggested. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
0. I. IRISH, 
lon. WILLIAA   . DOLE,                Superintendent Indian Affairs. 
Commissioner ndian Ajfairs, Vashington, D. C. 
No. 70. 
GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, U. T., 
September 1, 1864. 
Sin: MRr. Irish, the superintendent of Indian affairs in Utah Territory,
arrived in this city on the 26th of August.  He desired me to continue to
perform the duties of superintendent (there being then several parties of
Shosho- 
nees and Utahs here) until the 31st, which I did, and on that day delivered
to him 
all the public property in my bands belonging to the Indian department, for
which his receipts were taken. 
My accounts and returns up to that date will be forwarded in a few days.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
JAMES DUANE DOTY, 
Late Acting Sulerinendent Indian Affairs in Utah Territory. 
Hon. Wm. P. DOLE, 
Commissioner Indian Affairs. 
NEW MEXICO SUPERINTENDENCY. 
No. 71. 
SUPERINTENDENCY INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
Santa Fi, New MVUexico, October 10, 1864. 
SIR: Since my last annual report there has been but little ciange in our
relationa with the various tribes within this superintendency. 
Depredations upon the property of the citizens of this Territory still are
of 
frequent occurrence, and often accompanied by murders. While some of the
tribes have conducted themselves well, others are robbing and murdering our
people. The superintendent for the last half year has been without the means
to supply the well disposed with their usual amount of provisions. 
If they could have been supplied as usual, it is believed most of the depreda-
tions committed by them might have been prevented. Without any assistance
from the government, it is surprising that their destitute condition has
not led 
to more frequent complaints from owners of stock, whose herds graze in every
part of the country over which they roam. In my report of last year I urged
the propriety of concentrating the different bands of the various tribes,
and 
settling of each upon its own reservation, and in their own country. I still
believe this to be the true policy, and shall, therefore, in considering
the subject 
of our relations, and the policy best calculated to promote the interest
of the 
two races, speak of them uun. r four heads, viz.: Pueblos, Utahs, Apaches,
and 
Navajoes. 


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