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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Note from the Soviet Union to the United States, on a German peace treaty, March 2, 1959,   pp. 383-389 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 383

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 1 9944-59           -383
Note from the Soviet Union to the United States, on a German
Peace Treaty, --March 2, 19591
[Unofficial translation]
The Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics has
familiarized itself with the note of the Government of the United
States of America of February 16, 1959 and considers it necessary to
declare the following.
The note of the Government of the United States of America does
not give an answer to the concrete proposal of the Soviet Union with
regard to the conclusionof a German peace treaty and with regard
to the convening for this purpose of a peace conference of the states
which took part in the war with Germany, as well as with regard to
the normalization of the situation in Berlin. For the solution of
these questions, which have cardinal significance for the strengthen-
ing of peace in Europe and for the future of the German nation, the
Government of the United States of America endeavors to substitute
statements concerning the desirability of an examination by the four
powers, "of the German problem in all its aspects" and does not
ad-
vance on its part any proposals on the essence of the problem.
The very.raising of the question of Germany in this note speaks of
the lack of desire to consider either the situation in fact which has
arisen in Germany or the demands of common sense. If 14 years
ago Germany, although divided into-zones, remained a country with
one social structure, then' today two German states exist which have
developed in different directions. The governments of the Wester'n
powers, if they in actuality" arestriving toward a settlement of the
German question on a workable basis, cannot close their eyes to this
fact, especially since it was they who were the first to create the West
German state.
.Having taken from the very beginning of, the occupation a course
toward the division of Goermany,the United States of America,'Eng-
land and France at the same time were preparing. the rearmament
of the West German state created by -them. Thus they discarded '.the
Potsdam agreement, imbued with the ideas of the eradication of
German militarism from which the'peoples of Europe had suffered
at the price of incredible sacrifices and losses. As subsequent events
have shown, their chief concern was the drawing of Western Germ-any
into their military grouping. The participation of the Federal Re-
public of Germany in NATO permitted it to start openly the forma-
tion of the Bundeswehr and to 'demand the arming: of it with
atomic-missile armament. Pecisel'y as the result of the policy of
rearmament and encouragement of the, militaristic forces of Western
Germany, it is again necessary for the, European peoples to live under
conditions of. worry and alarm concerning their future.
Another independent German state-the German Democratic Re-
public-chose for itself a course of peace and social progress. Here
there are no grounds for the revival of militarism and the carrying
out of a policy of aggression and revenge. The government of the
German Democratic Republic has refrained from carrying out mili-
tary conscription and the formation of a mass army. The contrast
1 Department of State Bulletin, April 13, 1i,59, pp. 508-511. The United
States replied
on March 26, 1959 (infra).


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