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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Report of Commission to Crow Indians,   pp. 746-748 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 746

746                REPORT OF CROW      COMMISSION. 
REPORT OF COMMISSION TO CROW           INDIANS. 
(Act July 13, 1892, 27 Stats., p. 137.) 
LIVINGSTON, MONT., September 14, 1892. 
ion. T. J. MORGAN, 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 
SIR: The Commission appointed to negotiate with the Crow Indians of Mon-
tana for a modification of the agreement concluded with said Indians December
8, 1890, and ratified by Congress March 3, 1891, have the honor to submit
the 
following report: 
We met at the Crow Agency August 24, 1892. After several preliminary talks
with the Indians, the agreement herewith transmitted was entered into with
them August 27. Nearly every male adult Indian of the Crow tribe took part
in the council. According to the last census there are 666 adult male Crows.
The inclosed agreement is signed by 436 Indians. The council ratified the
treaty 
unanimously, and the signature of every adult male Crow could doubtless have
been secured by following the Indians to their homes, to which they scattered
as soon as the council broke up. The Indians were allowed to choose their
own 
interpreters, and the treaty was carefully explained to them, and seemed
to be 
thoroughly understood. The three days subsequent to the conclusion of the
treaty were spent by the Commission in making out and delivering to each
Indian named in schedule B, a certificate declaring him entitled to the tract
of 
land, or to a selection within the limits of the tract of land, with which
his name 
is connected in said schedule B. Before the unsurveyed selections in schedule
B can be surveyed the public land surveys must be extended over a wide tract
of 
conntry, involving much time and expense. With the limited means at the 
command of the Commission, this was impracticable. The Commission is of the
opinion that the rights of the claimants named in Schedule B are fully pro-
tected by the provisions of the first and second sections of the agreement
here- 
with transmitted. The tracts of land described in Schedule B are so bounded
by natural boundaries, or township or sectional lines, as to be readily identified
on the ground. There can be no excuse for trespassing upon them should any
one be so disposed. 
Schedules A and B were compiled from the Crow Land Book; from List A of 
claims, surveyed by Samuel Bundock, in January, 1891: from List B of allot-
ments made in August, 1890, by J. G. Hatchitt, special allotting agent, and
from 
List C of "Indians who made selections on the ceded part of the Crow
Reserva- 
tion in August, 1890,' under the supervision of J. G. Hatchitt. 
The following persons assisted in the preparation of said schedules: M. P.
Wyman, Crow agent; C. C. Kreidler, additional farmer, district No. 5, which
district includes the ceded part of the reserve; Bernard Bravo, the interpreter
who accompanied Mr. Hatchitt when the allotments and selections were made,
and who is thoroughly familiar with the owner and location of each allotment
or selection; and George R. Davis, who has lived among the Indians on the
ceded part for many years. When there was the slightest doubt as to the proper
location of any Indian claimant, the Indian himself was called before the
Com- 
mission and questioned through the interpreters. 
Schedules A and B were carefully interpreted to the Indians in council, and
they were invited to make such alterations or additions as they deemed right.
At the request of the Indians the Commission, after due investigation, added
the following names to schedule B: Sees the Lion, Snake Bull, He is a People,
Medicine Brings Things, Brings Things Always, Grabs the Knife, Big Eyes,
Strikes Her Painted Face, Falls Towards Her, Hunts to Die, Her House is 
Pretty, The Bird Everywhere, Takes the Rider of a Yellow Horse, The Swallow
Bird.                                                              _ 
The following-named Indians, included in list C, referred to above, were
omitted from Schedule B for the reason that they are dead. The first seven
are 
reported dead by Special Agent Leonard: Gives Things Everywhere (No. 17),
Went by the Side of the Enemy (No. 26), Goes to the Camp (No. 30), Kills
One 
Man (No. 42), Little Eyes (No. 86), Walks to the Water (No. 88), Little Old
Man 
(No. 91), Charley Bravo (No. 119), Charley Fisher (No. 120). 
Antelope, No. 101, list C, is omitted from schedule B, as her name appears
on 
schedule A, No. 98. 
No such person as Mrs. Peter Hibbart, No. 122, list C, could be found. If
there be any such Indian her rights, if any, are, it seems to us, fully protected
by section -, severalty act of 1887. 


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