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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in South Dakota,   pp. 426-482 PDF (29.8 MB)


Page 426

426           REPORTS OF AGENTS IN SOUTH DAKOTA. 
During all the years of my sojourn here I have ever kept in mind the fact
that my parents 
crossed the pathless plains on horseback away back in 1838, coming out from
their New Eng- 
land home as missionaries.to the Indians : and it was my duty to cherish
the missionary spirit. 
Nine of the first years of my life were passed among Indians. To this add
nearly fifteen at this 
agency, makes nearly half of my life thus spent. I now leave them, but not
to forget them, and 
my constant desire shall be that they may be helped and saved. 
Very respectfully, 
C. H. WALKER, 
Superintendent Agency Boarding School. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN SOUTH DAKOTA. 
REPORT OF OHEYENNE RIVER AGENCY. 
FOREST CITY, November 5, 1892. 
SIR: In compliance with the instructions contained in office letter of 25th
ultimo, I have the honor to forward this report for the past year. 
I took charge and full control of this agency July 25, 1892, relieving Special
United States Indian Agent Chas. HI. Thomp-son, and since then I have b en
kept very busy in the acquainting myself with the requirements and duties
of 
my position. I am unable to submit as full a report as I wish, bing in charge
only a short time. 
Location.-This agency is located on the west bank of the Missouri River,
some 
55 miles northeast of its former location at Fort Bennett, opposite Forest
City, 
Potter County, S. Dak., and it was moved to its present location in August,
1891. 
The post-office at this place is called Cheyenne Agency, and daily mails
are 
received and sent. The nearest telegraph o-fice is at Gettysburg, a terminal
station of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway, 16 miles east of the agency.
The Forest City and Sioux City Railroad, from Gettysburg, has its terminal
at 
Forest City, S. Dak., opposite to the agency. 
Population.-The census of the Indians of this agency was taken by my prede-
cessor, and the result of the same is as follows: 
Males    ----------------------------------------------------1, 153 
Females     ---------------------------------------------------1264 
Total,------------------------------------------------2417 
Males over 1 years-------------------------------------------603 
Females over14 years----------------------------------------843 
Males under 18 years  --------------------------------------  550 
Females under14 years---------------------------------------42L 
Total   -----------------------------------------------2,417 
Total between 6 and 16 years                                  583 
Total of school age, between 6 and 18 years old-------------------685 
This census is as near correct as could be had, with help then at hand in
get- 
ting, and will not be much out of the way. Comparison with the same of the
past 
year shows a decrease. The difference is due to the deaths and to those who
left the agency and went to Pine Ridge, and I am informed are now taken upon
the census rolls at said agency. The deaths this year are in excess of the
bir _hs. 
Occupations of the Indians.-They have been engaged during the past year in
farming and stock-raising. The farming has been on a limited scale compared
with the past. This was owing to the lateness of the spring; and so much
rain 
being had when the season to plow and plant was at hand, the acreage planted
was not up to the past years. Yet those of the progressive element among
the 
Indians who planted crops, and gave the same the proper attention, have been
successful in getting good returns, and from what I have seen I am satisfied
they 
will do better this year, as the crops so raised have encouraged them that
am 
ple returns will be the result of their labors and attention if given to
their f arm- 
ing in proper season. 
My own observation and experience are that this is no agricultural country.
While the farmners on the east side of the Missouri River fail at times to
make 
a success in farming, one must expect the Indians to do so, and one can not
hope 


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