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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in North Dakota,   pp. 350-370 PDF (11.5 MB)


Page 350

350          REPORTS OF AGENTS IN NORTH DAKOTA. 
these they will have the meams of supplying. A few years of Government super-
vision over their affairs, and of Government aid in their school work should
place them on an equal footing with their white neighbors. Then, and not
until then, the Government may well leave them to take care of themselves.
Then, and not until then, will they b3 in a position to make the most of
their 
natural talents for the good of themselves, their race, and their country.
Respectfully yours,                      ANDREW SPENCER, 
School Superintendent and Acting U. S. Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN NORTH DAKOTA. 
REPORT OF DEVIL'S LAKE AGENCY. 
DEVIL'S LAKE AGENCY. ,N. DAK., Auqust 30, 1892. 
SIR: As directed by your circular letter of June 23, I have the honor to
submit 
the following as my annual report for the year ending June 30, 1892, as agent
for the Indians of this agency. 
Location of reservation and agency.-The Devil's Lake Indian Reservation is
situ- 
ated in Benson County, N. Dak., in about latitude 480 north and longitude
990 
west, on the south shore of Devil's Lake, which forms the whole of the northern
boundary of the reservation. It extends about 36 miles east and west, and
7 to 
12 miles north and south to the Cheyenne River, which forms its southern
boundary. 
The agency is located at Fort Totten, on Devil's Lake, and nearly in the
center 
of the reservation east and west, and about 14 miles south of the city of
Devil's 
Lake, on the Great Northern Railroad, communication being had by a daily
line 
of steamboats in the summer season and a stage line during the winter. The
post-offlice address of the agency is Fort Totten, N. Dak. 
Builings.-The buildings at the agency are all in a good state of repair,
and are 
sufficient for all purposes required, except the old log building used as
uarters 
for the Indian employes at the agency. This building was built in 1867 for
the 
use of the military, and was afterward turned over to the Indian Department
for 
the use of the agency when the new fort was completed, and it is now in such
a 
state of decay and dilapidation that it is impossible to make it habitable
or safe; 
yet there are four Indian empfoyes' families living in this building. 
Population.-This reservation is occupied by part of the Sisseton, Wahpeton,
and Cut Head bands of Sioux Indians, numbering in all about 1,093 persons,
of which 516 are males and 577 females, 133 males and 136 females being of
school 
age, between the ages of 6 and 18 years. 
The Indians have occupied this reservation ever since it was set apart for
their 
use by the treaty of May 2, 1867. 
Allotment of lands.-The allotment of land on this reservation is very nearly
completed. Special Allotting Agent Joseph R. Grey, while here, allotted 934
In- 
dians and mixed bloods, that being nearly all the Indians on the reservation
ex- 
cept the wives of allottees. Special Agent James G. Hatchett is now here
com- 
pleting the work. 
The Indians are all well satisfied at the results of taking their land in
severalty, 
and great good to them must follow by fixing them in a permanent place which
they can call home, and which has heretofore been embraced in the one word
"tipi," the location of it being changed from one part of the reservation
to another 
every season. It was almost impossible to have the majority of them remain
long 
enough in a place to make any permanent improvements, but since they have
taken their lands in severalty they are appreciating the necessity of trying
to 
live like the white man. 
Houses-This summer these Indians, who had very poor houses or none, have
erected the logs for 150 new log houses on their several allotments, which
are 
now being completed for them by contract. When completed each house will
have a good shingled roof, be ceiled and have new doors, windows, and chimneys
put in, also a good lumber floor. This will add greatly not only to the comfort
but also to the health of the Indians, as so many of them are subject to
pulmo- 
nary and scrofulous diseases,that were aggravated by living six months in
the year 
I 


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