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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in Nebraska,   pp. 304-319 PDF (8.6 MB)


Page 304

304              REPORTS OF AGENTS IN NEBRASKA. 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN NEBRASKA. 
REPORT OF OMAHA AND WINNEBAGO AGENCY. 
OMAHA AND WINNEBAGO AGENCY, NEBR., 
September 1, 1892. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my third annual report, with the
census of the Indians at this agency and statistical information. 
The reservation.--This reservation is located on the eastern border of Nebraska,
and embraces, with the exception of a portion that has been sold, the entire
county of Thurston. It is bounded on the east by the Missouri River, is 18
miles 
from northern to southern limit, and extends west 30 miles, containing 245,200
acres of the finest agricultural lands, well watered, with an abundance of
timber. 
It is intersected by railways and surrounded by flourishing towns, which
afford 
the best of market facilities, rendering it one of the most desirable portions
of 
the State. 
The northern portion is occupied by the Winnebagoes, who acquired it by pur-
chase from the Omahas in 1865, who yet occupy the southern and larger portic
- 
of the reservation. 
Agency.-The agency headquarters for the two tribes is located in the eastern
portion of the Winnebago Reservation, but quite central as to the Winnebago
population, and 10 miles distant from the old and abandoned Omaha Agency.
The agency buildings are in a fair state of repair, and provide comfortable
quarters for the employes. Additional room is required for the proper housing
of the farm machinery. The addition this season of six self-binders, one
thresh- 
ing machine, besides mowers, rakes, planters, etc., renders this necessary,
and 
an estimate has been submitted for the building of a storehouse in the western
portion of the reservation, 20 miles distant from the agency. This will provide
for the machinery in use in that portion of the reserve, save the trouble
and ex- 
pense of transportation, and relieve the overcrowded agency warehouse. 
The gristmill, while the building is good, is only provided with old and
out- 
of-date machinery with which it is impossible to make flour of quality equal
to 
that produced by the mills adjoining the reservation. It should either be
sup- 
plied with new machinery or its use discontinued. In March last I procured
an 
estimate from a mill expert of what would be required to make thls a modern
mill and submitted the same for the consideration of the Department. 
Population.-The population of the two tribes, according to the census of
June 
30, 1892, is as follows: 
Winnebagoes- 
Total population ------------------------------------- 
Males above 18 years .............-                      389 
Females above 14 years  -------------------------------  400 
Children between 6 and 18---------------------------------273 
Omahas- 
Total population --------------------------------------- 1,186 
Males above 18  ----------------------------------------  293 
Females above14-----------------------------------------368 
Children between 6 and 18-------------------------------  323 
Owing to the many dissimilar conditions of the two tribes composing this
aoency-speaking an entirely different language, unlike in character and habits-
they will be treated separately in the remainder of this report. 
WINNEBAGOES. 
Location.-When the allotment of lands in severalty was made to the Winne-
bago Indians they were living in the eastern and timbered portion of the
reser- 
vation which is quite rough, and where in general only small tracts of good
agricultural lands can be found. They then considered that it was of much
more 
importance to have fuel within easy access than to have fine, level fields
for 
farming, and the allotment was therefore made so that almost every family
has 
40 or 80 acres in this portion of the reservation, the balance of each family's
allotment being in the central and western part of the reservation. Prior
to 
1889 little of the western two -thirds of the reservation was occupied or
made any 


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