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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Report of agent in Kansas,   pp. 269-275 PDF (3.9 MB)


Page 269

REPORT OF AGENT'IN KANSAS.'                    269 
way such a position would be created at this agency and a suitable person
ap- 
pointed at once to fill it.  - 
In the spring one of the most intelligent Indians was accidentally drowned.
Later his nephew committed suicide on account of grief, so it was said, over
his 
uncle's demise. Everything considered, the general health of these people
has 
been good during the past year. Some of the Indians now consult white phys-
icians and a greater number call at the mission for medicine. 
The census, taken June 30, gave the following result: 
Males------------------------------------------------196 
Females-----------------------------------------------------196 
Total   --------------------------------------        392 
Males above 18 years-----   -------------------------------101 
Females above 14 years  -----------------------------------126 
Number of school age (between 6 and 16)                    102 
Births     ------------------------------------------------10 
Deaths -  - - - - - -- - - - - -8 
I believe this report cbvers the desired ground. I have given the absolute
facts, plain and truthful, without coloring, andhave refrained, as far as
possible, 
from making recommendations, as this is not the proper place, as I understand
it, for such suggestions. For our year's work, though we can not report any
"4 great good" accomplished or " momentous reforms" inaugurated,
we-feel that 
we have strengthened our position in the confidence of these people and that
we 
have scattered seeds by the wayside by our everyday labors and example, which
will blossom in the y~ars to come and that the fruit will be seen and appreciated
in the future. I realize that there are many things which might be bettered,
if 
it were possible, for the welfare of these people, but the conditions and
sur- 
roundings are such as to make it impossible, or, rather impracticable. 
I feel in my heart that the years of 1892-'93 are going to bring forth changes
and advances among these Indians which will aid them very much in numerous
ways and also demonstrate to the public that there is a determination in
the minds 
and hearts of those who have charge of the affairs of the Indians at Washington
and here that these people must be lifted from their present degrading and
un- 
profitable life to one of higher aims and knowledge. That is our desire,
the 
goal for which we are laboring. 
Assuring all who chance to read this report that we shall not let up, in
the 
most trifling way, in our labors to improve the condition of the Indians
of the 
Sac and Fox, Iowa, Agency, but will strive even more faithfully in the future,
if 
it is possible to do so, and thanking all who have aided and encouraged us
by 
their acts of kindness and interest, both in the Indian Department and out,
dur- 
ing the past year, I am, 
Yours respectfully, 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
W. R. LESSER, 
United States Indian Agent. 
0, 
REPORT OF AGENT IN KANSAS. 
REPORT OF POTTAWATOMIE AND GREAT NEMAHA AGENCY. 
POTTAWATOMIE AND GREAT NEMAHA AGENCY, 
-Hoyt, Kans., August 29, 1892. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the affairs of this
agency and the Indian tribes located therein for the fiscal year ending June
30, 
1892, as directed in circular dated June 23 last. 
Population.-The names of the tribes embraced in the agency, the number of
each, together with the number of those of certain ages, including those
of school 
age, as ascertained by a recent census, is embodied in the following table,
viz: 


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