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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in Idaho,   pp. 233-242 PDF (5.5 MB)


Page 233

q -                 -W 
REPORTS 01? AGINTS MNTAHO.                     23 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN IDAHO. 
REPORT OF FORT HALL AGENCY. 
FORT- HALL INDIAN AGENCY, 
Ross Fork, Idaho, Aug. 24, 1892. 
SIR: In compliance with instructions I have the honor to submit this, my
third 
annual report: 
Consus.-A revision of the census just completed shows the number of deaths
during the last fiscal year to have exceeded the births by 28,.leaving the
pres- 
ent population of the reservation as follows: 
Bannacks: 
Male    --------------------------------        ---218 
Female     --------------------- --------------- 
442 
Shoshones: 
Male ---------------------------------------------45 
Female      -------------------------------------- 425 
-    878 
Total     ------------------------------------------ 1320 
Included in the above there is 160 children of school age who should attend
the Fort EDall Indian Industrial Training School, about only one-half of
which 
can be induced by persuasion to do so. United States troops would be required'*
to place and hold the remainder there. 
Unfortunately for the school, the death rate of the children who have hereto-
fore attended school has been far in excess of those Who have been permitted
to " 
live in tents with their parents. This is certainly not the fault of the
sanitary 
condition of the school, but it is a great drawback in filling the school,
as some 
.of the most progressive Indians on the reservation not only hesitate to
send their 
own children, but will not try to induce others to take advantage of the
benefits 
provided for them. These Indians are so badly blinded by superstition that
it is 
impossible to reason with them. There was a squaw came to the offire yester-_
day , formerly agency interpreter, and one of the most intelligent squaws
wI 
have, who informed me that the cause of the deaths of so many school children
was because they burned the children's hair after cutting it. She wanted
mato 
promise her that neither the hair nor old clothing belonging to the children
should be burned. 
The school is excellently equipped and amply capacious for the care of all
children of school. age on the reservation. For further particulars see report
of  -I 
bonded superintendent. 
Agriculture.-The only material advancement made in this line during the year
has been at the Blackfoot River settlement, at which point the Department
purchased 500 miner's inches of water for irrigating purposes, at an expense
of 
$1,500, and also had 100 acres of new land broken and put into wheat, oats,
tame 
grasses, etc., all of which promises a good yield. 
This laud was allotted to ten industrious Indians, who were dnable to procure
land covered by water elsewhere, and having been helped and encouraged-by
an 
additional farmer, constantly on the ground, have made fair progress in clear-
ing, and in some instances plowing and seeding, additional land, fencing,
etc. 
Fencing there has been only temporary, as the land is unsurveyed at that
place. However, the work of surveying all the tillable land on the reservation
is now in progress and will be completed during the next few months, after
which all fences will conform to subdivisions. 
The greatest improvement made here on the part of the Government during 
the last fiscal year was in furnishing two more additionalfarmers, with suitable
 VA- 
buildings at the Indian settlements for their use and occupancy. 
_The promised canal for supplying water for irrigating all farming land lying
  <:-: 
between Blackfoot River and the town of PocateloZsome 60,000 acres-has not
been constructed, notwithstanding a right of way was granted the Idaho Canal
 .  :. 
Company over a year ago. No work is being done, and I see no immediate-pros-
*pect of its completion. Until this water is supplied, or~ water procured
from 
some other source, there can be but little progress made in allotting land
or  -,.! 


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