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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in Arizona,   pp. 205-224 PDF (10.3 MB)


Page 205

REPORTS OF AGENTS. 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN ARIZONA. 
REPORT OF COLORADO RIVER AGENCY. 
COLORADO RIVER AGENCY, 
Parker, Ariz.,     , 1892. 
SIR: In compliance with regulations and instructions from your office, I
have 
the honor to submit the following report of affairs at this agency and of
the 
Indians under my charge for the fiscal year ending on the 30th day of June,
1892: 
Reservation and the agency.-The agency is situated 200 miles above Yuma,
Ariz., 
and about 87 miles below Needles, Cal., on the Arizona side of the Colorado
River, and about 1 mile from the river bank. The reservation extends along
the river for 55 miles. The agency is located near the upper end of the reser-
vation, and is so isolated from civilization that perhaps not more than t-n
white 
persons visit it in the course of a year. The United States mail arrives
and 
departs twice each week; it is carried on horseback from Yuma. The steam-
boats run when they can get a quantity of freight, consequently we are some-
times three months without means of transportation, only by means of a small
boat. The river is the only practicable route by which to reach the agency.
The weather is quite warm during four months in the year; the balance of
the 
year the climate is delightful. 
The Mojaves on the reservation'-Have all been quiet and peaceable and indus-
trious when they could find anything to do. There are no Indians more worthy
and deserving; give them only half a chance, and they will succeed. They
have 
full confidence in their ability to thrive as soon as the system of irrigation,
now 
under course of construction, is completed. For years they have been eking
out a miserable existence, planting little patches here and there after the
over- 
flow of the river, only raising a little wheat, corn, and melons, which they
con- 
sumed as fast as it matured, leaving nothing for them to live on through
the 
winter but mesquit and screw beans, reserving the screw beans for the last,
to 
pucker up their stomachs. 
Irrigation.-In the kindness and wisdom of your Department a sufficient appro-
priation has been granted to purchase a sixty horse-power boiler and two
vacuum 
pumps, warranted to throw 2,000 gallons of water per minute into the ditch.
The Mojaves are in ecstacy over their prospects and are already boasting
as to 
who will raise the most wheat and the largest pumpkins. An analysis of the
sediment which the Colorado River carries in large quantities shows that
the 
value of the fertilizing elements contained in it is amply sufficient to
counter- 
balance the cost of pumppg. The sediment is heavily charged with phosphates
and nitrates, which, addctl to the soil as it is, will make it wonderfully
produc- 
tive. From two to three crops can be raised each year on the same land. About
10 acres for each family will be amply sufficient and all they can cultivate
suc- 
cessfully. The pumps will no doubt.be in successful working order by the
first 
of October, and then the Mojaves will proceed to put in a large acreage of
wheat, 
which they will harvest in April or May. As soon as the pumps are in success-
ful operation many of the Mojaves at Needles and some of the Hualapais will
no 
doubt return here, as there is land enough for them all, and no reason why
they 
should not all be placed here. 
Improvements.-During the year a new schoolhouse has been completed at an
expense of $3.985. It is 40 by 80, two stories high, built of adobes, 10
by 20 on 
first story and 8 by 16 second story. On the first floor there is a 10-foot
hallway, 
205 
-A 


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