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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1884
([1884])

Report of Hampton school,   pp. 189-202 PDF (7.3 MB)


Page 189

REPORT OF HAMPTON         SCHOOL.                 189 
DISCIPLINE. 
We have continued the system of trial of offenses by courts composed of the
stu- 
dents, with the same satisfactory results as previously reported. 
In conclusion, I reiterate the sentiments of my second annual report-that
for 
1880-8l. To be successful in the work of Indiati education we must undertaketo
edu- 
cate all the children; to give a veneering of education to a small minority,
or to boys 
alone, only breeds failure. Among Indians, as well as whites, public opinion
controls, 
and the majority controls that opinion. It is not the fear that we may educate
the 
children away from sympathy with their former savagery that should influence
us; 
but rather we should fear that we may fall short of getting enough of education
and 
training into the particular subject to enable him to stand and compete in
civilized 
life. The city of Philadelphia supports schools and gives education to 105,000
chil- 
dren to maintain its civilization. Is it not criminal for the United States
to promise 
and then neglect to give to its 50,000 Indian children the education which
the Gov- 
ernment, in its treaties with then, says "11will insure their civilization?"
If the free- 
doin of citizenship is to le their lot, then the surroundings and experiences
of freedom 
and goodcitizenshil) dnriig education will best equip them. More than three-fourths
of the children are still out of school. The apathy of the Government in
meeting its 
self-iniposed obligation to the Indians in school matters, by providing such
meager 
school privileges, Woull indicate that it has no especial desire to civilize
or save them. 
With great respect, your obedient servant, 
R. H. PRATT, 
Captain Tenth Caalry, Sup)erintendent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
HAMPTON NORMAL AND AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE, 
llampton, Va., September 1, 1884. 
SIR: I have the honor to make the following report on the work for Indians
at this 
institute for the past year. 
INTRODUCTORY. 
It has become a part of Hampton's duty to supply an object lesson on the
capacity 
for improvement of the two races with whom it is dealing. From February till
May 
and during July and August the school is visited constantly by thousands
of guests, 
representing all sections of the country,. from the neighboring winter and
summer 
resorts, especially from the Hygeia Hotel, 2 miles distant. I think valuable
im- 
pressions have been made and a better sentiment regarding both races created;
the 
Indians having, however, been the chief objects of curiosity. 
The elevation of the negro is merely a matter of time and effort; to this
end nothing 
has proved more favorable than his position as an American citizen. An equal
ca- 
pacity has been shown by the Indian, but the most important condition of
progress, 
citizenship, has, for him, not yet beeu created. That is the turning point.
The question is no longer, can the Indian be civilized'? but rather, what
be- 
comes of the civilized Indian? The best answer we can give is, that of over
100 
trained Indians, chiefly Sioux, who since 1881 have returned from Hampton
to their 
homes, not over 12 have wholly relapsed to Indian ways; not one has become
a 
bad character. Most of themn are doing well, and some very well. Their success
de- 
pends largely on the agent's interest in and care for them. They were, at
last re- 
ports, employed as follows: 
BOYS. 
Teaching in Government schools..........---------------. ----------------------4
Assisting  in Government school....................-------------------- --
----- 1 
Clerks at agency Government schools.   .       .      ..--------------------------------------
2 
Interpreter at agency Government school. .      .      ..-----------------------------------1
Working at trades ia Government schools.  .      .      ..----------------------------------
9 
Employs in Government schools------------.............................. -4
Attending school at Government schools-----------------------------------...
3 
Working on their own or parenta' farms-----------------------------......
Cutting cord wood------------------------------------......................
2 
Young boys at home behaving well------------------------------------    
4 
Unemployed and adrift------------------------------........................
Returned to Hampton for more education-----------------------------.. - 5


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