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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1884
([1884])

Report of agent in Iowa,   pp. 100-101 PDF (916.8 KB)


Page 100

100                  REPORT OF AGENT IN IOWA. 
STOCK AND CROPS. 
It is estimated that during the last winter, which was severe, not less than
15 per 
cent. of the stock died from exposure. No feed is provided, nor care taken
of cattle. 
The crops of corn, wheat, oats, cotton, and pecans promise an abundant yield.
SCHOOLS. 
Each of these nations has a )u)lic-school system similar to those of the
States, and 
holds teachers' institutes at its capital annually. The settlements are so
far apart 
that schools can be established only at neighborhoods where ten or more scholars
can 
be got together. The neighborhood builds the house, and the nation furnishes
teach- 
ers and books. Most of the teachers are educated Indians who teach the English
only, 
in their schools. In addition to the neighborhood schools each nation has
academies 
and seminaries, boarding schools for their children only. The Cherokees have
two 
tine seminaries that have been in successful operation for many years.  They
are 
managed and operated by Cherokees. The Choctaws have three large academies,
one 
under the management of the Methodist Church South, and the other two by
the 
Presbyterian Missionary Board. The Chickasaws have four academies conducted
by 
contractors who are citizens of the Chickasaw Nation. The Seminoles have
two, one 
under the management of the Methodist Church South, the other by the Presbyterian
Missionary Board, the nation paying the managers about $80 per annum for
each 
pupil boarded, clothed, and educated. The Creeks have four seminaries under
the 
management of the following religious societies: The Methodist Church South,
South- 
ern Baptist, Presbyterian, and Baptist Home Missionary Societies, the latter
for Creek 
fteedmen. 
In addition to the above there are subscription schools. These are schools
estab- 
lished by private enterprise and students paying tuition, except in cases
where indi- 
viduals or societies in the State pay tuition for certain students. These
schools 
receive no support from the nations. Worcester Academy, at Vinita, under
the super- 
vision of the Congregational Society, erected two years ago by funds subscribed
by 
citizens of the Cherokee Nation, is one of the best in the Territory, and
has an average 
of about 100 students. Harrell Institute, at Muskogee, managed by the Methodist
Church South, has about 140 students, and has in progress of erection a fine
academy 
building. Indian University, at Tahlequah, managed by the Baptist Home Missionary
Society, is a flourishing school. It will be removed to Muskogee as soon
as buildings 
now in course of erection are completed. The schools managed by religious
societies, 
either as pay schools or under contract with the nations, are generally the
most sue- 
cessful. 
RECOMMENDATIONS. 
I respectfully recommend that proper steps be taken to secure passage of
laws pro- 
viding for imprisonment of intruders who return after being removed; for
punishment 
for stealing coal and timber from the reservations; for establishing a United
States 
court within the Territory, as the treaty provides; for increasing the pay
of the 
police, and for payment of the principal to the Indians who receive per capita
pay- 
Xmeats. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
JNO. Q. TUFTS, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
SAC AND Fox AGENCY, 
Tama County, Iowa, August 29, 1854. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit my sixth annual report of the condition and
prog- 
ress of the Indians under my charge. 
- The Fox or Musquakie tribe of Indians, according to the census just made,
number 
in all 365 persons, and are located in Tarna County, Iowa, where they own
1,340 acres 
of lanud held in trust for them by the governor of the State of Iowa. Individual
[n- 
dians also own 85 acres in their own right. This tract of land is about one-third
timber, and the balance good grazing anti farming land, though subject to
overflow 
in time of high water. 
It is also fenced with wire and borards, and about 233 acres are under cultivation
this 
year. The estimated yield of the crops will be, of corn, 5,000 bushels ;
potatoes, 1,000 
bushels; beans, 800 bushels; turnips, 100 bushels; also of pumpkins, squash,
melons, 
S    and other vegetables about 100 wagonloads. This will furnish the tribe
all the food 


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