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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1884
([1884])

Reports of agents in Dakota,   pp. 20-63 PDF (21.1 MB)


Page 20

20                  REPORTS OF AGENTS IN          DAKOTA. 
have been unable to renovate it. Special Agent Lueders and Inspector Gardner
have 
both reported the situation to the-Department. I was informed that if I would
make 
a detailed statement of what was necessary action would be taken to remedy
the 
evil. This I did last January, and since that time I have not heard from
the Depart- 
ment on the subject. By another year the agent, will be compelled to vacate
the 
house, for reasons already stated. I inclose herewith statistical report.
Very respectfully, 
WARREN PATTEN, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
CHEYENNE RIVER AGENCY, DAKOTA TERRITORY, 
August 20, 1884. 
SIR: In compliance with instructions contained in circular letter from the
Office of 
Indian Affairs under date of July 1, 1884, I have the honor to submit herewith
my 
annual report for 1884. 
TRIBES AND POPULATION. 
The Indians of this agency, comprising 753 families, aggregating 3,144 persons,
are 
composed of the Blackfeet, Sans Arc, Minneconjou, and Two Kettle bands of
Sioux, 
and are classified respectively as fol~ows, which classification embraces
the number 
of children of school-going ages, tabulated in accordance with the recent
provision of 
Congress: 
School cbildren be- Children under 6 
Number                   tween 6 and 18    years old. 
Name of band.  of fam-  Men.  Women.     years old.                    Total.
'ilies. 
Male.  Female.  Male.  Fema e 
Blackfeet-........... 52     51      71      36      40      10      16 
    224 
Sans Arc............200     214     273     105     108      41      47 
    788 
Minneconjou         325     357     456     190     212      85      82 
  1 382 
T w o  K ettle  ........  176  190  273     115      91     44      37  
   750 
Total --------  753    8121   1, 073   446     451     180     102    3,144
AGRICULTURE. 
The Indians of this agency are evincing a rapid and remarkably encouraging
ad- 
vancement in agricultural and civilized pursuits. Notwithstanding the grass
is very 
thin and scarce this season, they have cut and stacked about 1,800 tons of
hay for use 
of their stock during the coming winter. Corn, potatoes, turnips, onions,
beans, and 
melons haxe been raised by them during the season with fair success. A large
ma- 
jority of them are cultivating claims and fields comprising from 1 to 15
acres, part 
of which is fenced and nearly all of which is in excellent condition. 
The small farm of 8 acres attached to the boys boarding and industrial school
has 
been cultivated by the older pupils, under the supervision of the agency
farmer and 
other employ6s, with fair succe,,s. They have iaised thereon this season
corn, pota- 
toes, turnips, beans, melons, and pumpkins. The large area of ground occupied
by 
this agency, stretching from Antelope Creek on the south to the Morean River
on the 
north, a distance of about 150 miles. and west from the Missouri River about
125 
miles, requires more attention on the part of instructors for the Indians
in the method 
of farming and agricultural pursuits than the limited number of em  loyds
allowed me 
by the Government will admit. The employment of Indian district farmers,
now au- 
thorized for the coming year, will materially advance the interests of Indian
farmers, 
but practical white men engaged for this purpose Would be much more advanta-
geous to the Indian and satisfactory in its results. 
SANITARY. 
The general health of the Indians has been good and there has not been any
epi- 
demic among them during the year. During part of the past winter measles
prevailed 
endemically in the boys' boarding and industrial school, and in the Saint
John's 


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