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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1880
([1880])

Report of the joint committee of the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States, on the protection of Indians in their civil rights,   pp. 185-188 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 185

REPORT OF SCHOOL AT HAMPTON.                                 185 
A brother to his sister: 
DAKOTA. 
MY SISTER: I want you to learn all you can and learn something good, and
God watch you all the 
t:'ne. I want you to learn something. That's the reason I let you go to Hampton.B
HEAD. 
An Indian father to his boy's teacher: 
YANKTON AGEN'Y, DAK.. Januitary 26, 1880. 
Gen. ARMSTRONG: 
MY FRIEND: You got my letter, and you answered it, and when I saw your letter
my heart was very 
glad. But when I saw your face in it I was most pleased of all. Then I made
a feast and called the 
parents of the children that have gone to school. They were all so glad,
they passed it around and each 
one gave it a kiss. So now we have all seen you, and it seems as if we can
now trust you to take good 
care of our children. Perhaps you don't know that Indians think of their
children a great deal, and 
don't know how to have them out of their sight one day. So now, my friend,
you know how I felt 
about my two boys, but I can trust you now, and I want you to look after
them and take good care of 
them, and if anything happens to them I want you to tell me soon. 
I shake hands with you.                          Your friend,       FAT MANDAN.
A full-blood Indian chief writes to his half brother from Crow Creek, August
25,1879: 
I am going to write you a letter; I never forget you. Try to learn all you
can while you are down 
there. I wish I were young so I could go down and learn too. I want you to
learn all you can and come 
back and teach your brothers. Try to learn and talk English, too. Don't think
about coming home all 
the time. If you do you can't learn much. I like to have you write a letter
back and tell me how you 
are. 
WIZI-THAT'S I. 
Our 250 negro and 66 Indian youth have for twenty-two months been in constant
contact at this institution. There has been slight, not serious, friction.
There is no 
difficulty from race prejudice. The negro is a help to the Indian as an example,
by 
his habits of study and of labor, of obedience, of behavior, of general decency,
and 
by his knowledge of English. The latter here is in an atmosphere of industry,
good 
conduct, and of our language, which does much for his progress. Colored teachers
have been remarkably successful in influencing and training Indians. The
objective 
point with both races is the same development of character, of industry,
skill, and of 
good habits, through a sufficiency of English studies and by a manual labor
system, 
under good discipline and strong moral and religious influence. To do this
work 
rightly requires complicated and expensive establishments, but it is far
cheaper than 
the extermination policy. I trust the government will provide generously
for this and 
all other work for the elevation of the Indian race. The great demand upon
the 
charitable of our country makes the work of raising funds for our Indian
effort one 
of difficulty. 
I trust that the public officers who have legislative or executive duties
with refer- 
erence to the red race of our country will visit and inspect the institution
as they 
shall have the opportunity. 
I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant, 
S. C. ARMSTRONG, Principal. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Report of the joint contmittee of the General Convention of the Protestant
Episcopal Church. 
of the United States, on the protection of Indians in their civil rights.
WASHINGTON, NAovember 29, l80. 
SIR: As secretary of the joint committee of the General Convention of the
Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, appointed at its recent
session 
to aid your efforts to civilize and protect the Indians in their civil rights,
I take the 
liberty of bringing to your attention the inclosed report. 
Yours, respectfully, 
MONTGOMERY BLAIR.. 
HON. CARL SCHURZ, 
Secretary of the Interior. 
REPORT OF THE JOINT C011MAIITTEE ON SECURING FOR THE INDIANS THE PROTECTIOXNi
OF THE CIVIL LAW. 
To the General Concention  of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Unlited
States of America: 
The joint committee appoint ed at the last general convention, with power
to take 
such steps as in their discretion might lbe judicious and effectiv e towards
securing: 
fr~om the governmient, for the Indians, the full protection of the civ ii
lawv, respect- 
fully report : 
The complex nature of onr government, growing out of" the division and
distribu- 
tion of powers between the general government and the several State gov ernments,


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