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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Wisconsin,   pp. 371-380 PDF (4.4 MB)


Page 371

REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN WISCONSIN.                371 
disputed boundary line and the disposition of the surplus and unallotted
lands 
passed both houses of Congress last session and became a law, and the provi-
sions of the bill in reference to allotments, surveys, and reservations to
be made 
for the benefit of the Indians are being carried out. The commission recently
appointed to make recommendations to carry out the provisions of section
2 of 
the bill as to reservations, etc.. has as yet been unable to report, and
in order to 
make an intelligent report they deem it advisable to wait until the boundary
line is surveyed and marked and other surveys are made, and until the pending
litigation in reference to water rights is settled, either in the courts
or by 
agreement. 
Grazing permits.-During the past year there have been granted fiVe permits
for the grazing of cattle on the tribal lands of the reservation and three
for the 
grazing of sheep. The total amount derived from this source is $2,345. The
cattle permits are for small bunches of cattle, and are granted to farmers
who 
live near the reservation and have small holdings of cattle. As I stated
in my 
last report, the range and conditions here are not favorable to grazing except
to a very limited extent, and it requires a large amount of land to furnish
range 
for a very small number of stock. Nearly all places where water can be ob-
tained are allotted to Indians, and permits are granted to pasture only on
tribal 
lands. 
Increase of appropriation.-The Indian appropriation bill passed at last 
session of Congress increased the appropriation for this agency to $8,000,
this 
being an increase over that for the preceding year of $5,000. This increase
was 
very much needed and will greatly assist me in carrying on the work in the
office 
and in the field. 
Courts and crimes.-The Indian court was abolished on the reservation on 
June 30, 1905, no authority to appoint judges being granted. Now all the
Indi- 
ans of the reservation must look to the courts of the State for redress of
griev- 
ances, and when Indians are charged with the commission of crimes they are
arrested and tried in the State courts, just as white citizens are. 
Since it was decided in the courts that it is not a crime to sell intoxicating
liquor to an allotted Indian, drinking among the Indians is on the increase;
and 
as drunkenness and crime go hand in hand, we consequently have an increase
of 
crime, and the local authorities will have plenty to do if they prosecute
all 
offenders. 
Census.-As stated in preceding reports, there are quite a large number of
Indians allotted on this reservation who do not reside here, and there are
only 
about 1,400 actually residing on the reservation. My estimate of the number
of 
Indians actually residing on the reservation is as follows: 
Males above 18 years of age------------------------------450 
Females above 18 years of age-----------------------    500 
School children between 6 and 18 years--------------250 
Children under 6 years of age-------------------------  200 
Total,------------------------------------------1 400 
JAY LYNCH, Superintendent. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN WISCONSIN. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF GREEN BAY AGENCY* 
KESHENA, Wis., August 15, 1905. 
This agency, embracing the Menominee and the Stockbridge and Munsee 
reservations, is located at Keshena, Wis., 8 miles distant from Shawano,
the 
nearest railroad and telegraph station. The Menominee Reservation contains
10 townships, or 230,400 acres of land, of which 10 sections, containing
6,400 
acres, are school lands and 14,920 acres are swamp lands ceded to the State
of 
Wisconsin under the school and swamp land acts. 
The Stockbridge and Mnnsee Reservation contains 11,500 acres of land, 360
acres of which are swamp lands, the title to which is in the State. Twenty-
eight patents for 80-acre tracts have been issued to individual members of
the tribe. The balance of the land although unallotted has been filed upon
in 
40 and 80 acre tracts in accordance with the provisions of the "Beede"
plan of 


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