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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Utah,   pp. 352-355 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 352

352      REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF YANKTON SCHOOL. 
GREENWOOD, S. DAK., August 10, 1905. 
The enrollment for the year was 124, the average attendance 110, the capacity
of 
the school 120. The enrollment and average attendance is less than it was
last year, 
owing to the fact that 105 Indian children of school age attended the district
schools, 
which are distributed over the reservation. About 100 of the older boys and
girls have 
attended schools off the reservation. 
Health.-The health of the pupils during the year was very good. No epidemics
of any kind. No deaths occurred during the year. Several pupils were excused
from 
school on account of tuberculosis. 
Literary work.-This department of the work was in charge of three efficient
and 
experienced teachers, who were doing excellent work. In January a new and
inexpe- 
rienced teacher was appointed. Her work was not very satisfactory. 
Industrial work.-The pupils were regularly detailed once a month to work
in the 
different departments. In the sewing room the girls were taught to cut, fit,
make, and 
mend their own garments. The boys were also taught to help mend their own
garments. 
The boys and girls under the supervision of the matrons were taught to do
housework 
in a neat, careful way. The girls' building was kept as neat and homelike
as could 
be wished. The work in the laundry was not very satisfactory, as the laundress
was 
new and inexperienced and lacked interest in the work. The boys and girls
detailed 
to the kitchen and bakery were carefully looked After and taught to do their
work in 
a neat, careful manner. 
The farmer and industrial teacher, with the assistance of the boys, have
under culti- 
vation 40 acres of corn, 12 acres of millet, 5 acres in oats, 6 acres in
potatoes, 5 acres 
in garden -truck, and 4 acres in alfalfa. The garden will produce all the
vegetables 
the school can use. The crops all look fine and promise a good yield. 
Stock.-The school stock comprises the following: Six horses, 1 colt, 22 cows,
15 
heifers, 22 steers, 10 calves, 1 bull, 21 hogs, and 19 pigs. During the year
the following 
stock was sold: Ten steers, 5 cows, and 49 hogs. 
Religious instruction.-There are two churches, Episcopal and Presbyterian,
about 
one-half mile from the school, where the pupils are taken twice each Sabbath
when the 
weather is suitable. 
Water system.-The water supply for the school Is taken from the Missouri
River by a 
steam pumping plant and pumped into large storage tanks. The tanks hold about
2,400 
barrels of water, and the pressure seems to be sufficient for good fire protection.
The 
sewer system is in good working condition. 
Buildings.-The buildings are In fair condition, but need painting and some
repairing. 
The repairs have not been kept up on account of material not being furnished.
To the buildings of the school plant should be added an oil house for storing
coal oil 
and a hog house built to accommodate 50 or 75 hogs, a steam-heating plant
installed, and 
a gasoline or acetylene lighting plant put in to take the place of the kerosene
lamps now 
in use. 
This school plant is nicely located and is 14 miles from Wagner, our nearest
railroad 
and telegraph station. 
DAVID W. BETTS, Superintendent. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN           UTAH. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF SHIVWITZ. 
PANGUITCH, UTAH, August 21, 1905. 
During the fiscal year 1905 not much has been done here. The year began 
with the disappointment at the failure of new buildings and other necessities
to 
materalize, and except a spurt of expectancy during the period when bids
were 
being prepared it has been spent with the same disappointment. 
Yet, in spite of discouragements and disappointments, the year has been 
both prosperous and successful in many ways. For one thing, the Indians are
more interested as they see even small improvements. Other bands, not in
reach hitherto, are beginning to send representatives to visit and to inquire
about the school. Then, the children themselves are intensely interested
in 
their own gardens and in the farm, dairy, and household work. They begin
to realize that it is their work, and to see how it will help them when they
go home. Also they begin to make practical application as far as possible
of 
the things already learned when on their vacation visit to their homes in
the 
summer, which is encouraging. And we see more progress in literary and other
lines, because, having learned how to learn, they are advancing more rapidly
and understandingly. In this our returned students have been of great help
to the raw recruits. 
The enrollment for the year has been the largest since the first year of
the 
day school, and, except the two boys sent home sick from Carlisle, we had
no 
deaths, and but little serious illness, for which, in view of our insanitary
conditions, we are duly thankful. We transferred four to Haskell, and two
young men are awaiting an opportunity for Carlisle, but the i adications
are 


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