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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Kansas,   pp. 224-227 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 224

224     REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN KANSAS. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF KICKAPOO, SAUK AND FOX, AND IOWA. 
HORTON, KANS., August 23, 1905. 
There has been an unusual and excessive death rate among the members of 
the Kickapoo tribe of Indians of this agency during the past year, the excess
of 
deaths over births being 15. The cause is directly traceable to the want
of 
proper sanitation and hygienic laws in the homes, tuberculosis and venereal
diseases being the most numerous causes of death. 
There has been a great decrease in the sales of inherited Indian land owing
to the new ruling, but every dollar of the proceeds which has been expended
has been applied to some good purpose. There are four allotments on this
reservation without known heirs and consequently remaining idle. Two of 
these allotments are now being investigated by proper courts in order to
deter- 
mine the heirs, and two of them are without heirs, traced back as far as
the 
grandfather of the allottee, who was an old man when he died. - There are
over 
40 tracts of inherited Indian land on this small reservation. 
Over $200 has been voluntarily contributed by the Indians of this reservation
toward improving the roads. The rural free delivery has been extended to
every 
farm house in this county, which carries with it a necessity for better roads
on 
the reservation which the county officials have taken up and are aiding in
main- 
taining good roads throughout the reservation. 
Informal leasing on this reservation has been eliminated. The number of 
formal leases has been somewhat diminished and a proportionate increase of
land cultivated by Indians resulting therefrom. 
Drunkenness has been greatly diminished and would have been practically 
eliminated but for the decision in the Heff case, which was fought very stub-
bornly to a decision adverse to our interest. There was great rejoicing among
the licentious classes when this decision was published. Albert Heff, the
defendant, although successful in winning a decision, was put to so much
expense 
as to put him out of business. The State authorities renewed tl4eir active
opposition to illicit whisky selling, and have done much to overcome the
bad 
effect of the Heff decision. With the increase in amount of labor performed
by the Indians on this reservation, a decrease in idleness and drunkenness,
we can discern a small and appreciable advancement in the moral tone of these
people. 
Kickapoo Training School.-This school is located on the Kickapoo reserva-
tion, 7 miles west of Horton, Kans. The buildings consist of one large dormi-
tory with a capacity of 70 pupils, and is in good repair; one employees'
cottage 
in good repair;'one office building in good repair; one new superintendent's
cottage, which is nearing completion, and several minor buildings in fair
con- 
dition. The dormitory is heated by hot-water system and lighted by gas. 
The water for school use is pumped over one-half mile, from spring in pas-
ture. The pump is run by windmill during the windy season and gasoline 
engine at other times. The hot-water boiler burst during the coldest time
last 
winter, which delayed reconvening of pupils after holidays for over three
weeks. 
The new boiler has been placed and the system is now in excellent repair.
With the exception of the break in work caused by bursting of the boiler
and 
smallpox quarantine prohibition the schoolroom work advanced along very 
satisfactory lines. 
During the year the health of the pupils was very satisfactory. 
Highly satisfactory results have been obtained on the school farm during
the 
year. Twenty acres of wheat yielded over 325 bushels. The yield in the garden
was unusually large. Over 300 bushels of oats have been thrashed, and it
is 
estimated that we will have over 2,000 bushels of corn. The increase of stock
has been very satisfactory, and the interest the boys have taken in farming
has 
increased to a commendable degree. 
All the departments under the matron have obtained highly satisfactory 
results. 
Sauk and Fox of the Missouri Reservation.-The Indians of this reservation
are making a very gratifying progress in farming and stock raising, several
of 
them having bank accounts which are the product of their own labor and 
economy. 
The school on this reservation did excellent work under the very able manage-
inent of G. H. Marshall, who, I am sorry to say, resigned to accept a more


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