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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Report concerning Indians in Iowa,   pp. 221-223 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 221

REPORT CONCERNING INDIANS IN IOWA2 
was 181, of which but 12 were approved and the roads established; 7 of 
these were In the Cherokee Nation and 5 in the Creek Nation. Eleven of these
cases were so urgently desired by the residents and persons interested that
dam- 
ages were waived. In the other case the damages were assessed and in due
time 
paid from tribal funds, as the law provides. 
Many complaints have been received from the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and 
Seminole nations. When allotments are made the citizens desire to fence in
same, and in doing so close up roads which meander across their lands. A
road 
is a public necessity, and in view of the importance of the matter it is
respect- 
fully suggested that some provision be made by Congress for establishing
section- 
line and other roads in the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole nations. The
earlier it is done the better. 
DELAWARE-CHEROKEE IMPROVEMENTS. 
As mentioned in the last annual report of this office, the Indian agent was,
on 
May 11, 1904, designated by the President to perform the duties prescribed
by 
the act of April 21, 1904 (33 Stat. L., 189), relating to the approval of
the valua- 
tions at which improvements of Delaware-Cherokee citizens upon their surplus
holdings of land may be sold; and the records show that, acting under the
instructions and regulations of the Department, dated May 12, 1904, the agent
considered and approved bills of sale presented by Delaware-Cherokee citizens
conveying to Cherokees or freedmen, who were entitled to allotments, certain
improvements upon the surplus holdings of said Delawares, as follows: Bills
of sale filed, 419; bills of sale approved, 301; total number of acres involved,
13,807.72; total value of improvements as fixed by agent, $20,995; average
value 
per acre, $1.52. 
Subsequently the provision of law contained in said act of April 21, 1904,
in 
reference to this matter was practically reenacted by the Indian appropriation
act approved March 3, 1905 (33 Stat. L., 1071), allowing Delaware-Cherokee
citizens six months from that date in which to dispose of their improvements
upon their surplus holdings. Under this legislation Mr. Cyrus Beede, United
States Indian inspector, was designated to value such improvements and per-
form the necessary duties in connection therewith. No further action was
taken by the agency with reference to this matter during the remainder of
the fiscal year. 
Conclusion.-Owing to the short time I have had charge of Union Agency 
and as this annual report covers a period not within my administration, I
refrain 
from making general recommendations or discussing general policies. I do
urge, however, in addition to the desirability and necessity of the establish-
ment of public roads along section lines in the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Semi-
nole nations, that proper provision be made for the continuation of Indian
schools after expiration of the tribal governments on March 4, 1906, and
for 
the maintenance of other schools until a Territorial or State government
is 
formed and appropriate legislation enacted in connection therewith. Should
such provision not be made, all schools now existing in - the Territory,
except 
those maintained by private subscription and in incorporated towns, must
close 
on the above date. 
DANA H. KELSEY, United States Indian Agent. 
REPORT CONCERNING INDIANS IN IOWA. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF SAC AND FOX AGENCY. 
TOLEDO, August 22, 1905. 
No material change has been wrought in the attitude of the Indians toward
the school by reason of the change in name from that of agent to superintendent
(which occurred July 1. 1904) as was feared, but on the contrary it was noted
that the violent opposition to the school at first manifested by these people
is 
giving way to a spirit of stolid indifference. 
Factionalism, while not so rampant as formerly, is still deep seated in the
minds of the nonprogressive element of these people who are opposed to the
reign of the recognized chief, and is largely the result of the influence
and 
machinations of evil-disposed white men, who expect to reap pecuniary profit
221 


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