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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Arizona,   pp. 156-180 PDF (12.1 MB)


Page 156

APPENDIX. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN ARIZONA. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF COLORADO RIVER AGENCY. 
PARKER, ARIZ., July 25, 1905. 
The census shows the following population: 
Males of all ages-                                        272 
Females of all ages.---------------     -   ------        236 
508 
Over 18 years of age (males, 159; females, 156)--------------315 
School children between 6 and 18 (males, 79; females, 57) --- 136 
I can note quite a change for the better among these Indians over their condi-
tion of a year ago. Many wear better clothes, seem better spirited, more
con- 
tented, and evince a deeper interest in their own welfare and appearance
than 
formerly manifested. These changed conditions are traceable things, viz:
The 
Government provided them more labor at moderate wages than formerly; they
sold their wood for a better price and received the money for it, instead
of wood 
checks on the traders, a custom that prevailed for years, and they have paid
close attention to my directions and instructions in all matters pertaining
to 
their welfare and advancement, seeming to realize that it was for their especial
benefit, and I feel encouraged over their future outlook. 
There has been a noticeable increase in the birth rate during the year, our
records showing a gain of 300 per cent over that of a year ago. However,
this 
has been checkmated by the increased number of deaths, the mortality being
exceptionally large among the infants and small children. Pulmonary troubles
seem to afflict the newly born babe as well as the adult or more advanced
youth. 
It seems impossible to check the ravages of consumption among them, fully
95 
per cent of the deaths being directly traceable to this cause. All that can
be 
done by medical skill and treatment is supplied them, and yet it seems of
little 
avail in fighting this disease. 
The general health of the reservation as an entirety has been very good and
will compare favorably with that of former years. 
There have been but few marriages and no divorces among them during the 
year. 
The installation, last December, of an additional 80-horsepower new steam
boiler, together with a new and improved feed-water pumping and feed-water
apparatus, hias put our irrigating pumping plant in the best condition; and
with- 
out a doubt we now have one of the best equipped, so far as machinery is
con- 
cerned, centrifugal pumping plants in the entire service, with the result
that 
the acreage of Indian farms under cultivation and irrigation is the largest
it 
has ever been, and to-day through the inauguration of the above machinery
we 
are supplying more land with a continuous run of water than ever possible
heretofore, and this acreage will be further increased in another year. 
For several years the lower portion of the reservation has been overrun by
herds of trespassing cattle, the property of irresponsible Mexican owners
from 
whom it was impossible to collect a grazing tax. I determined to teach them
a 
lesson and, if possible, compel them to comply with the law. With the assist-
ance of the Indians almost 100 of their cattle were captured and brought
to 
the agency, and the owners notified to call for same and pay damages. In
the course of a few days thereafter I collected -a heavy fine from them,
and my 
action in bringing those trespassers to justice has resulted in procuring
the 
largest revenue yet derived at this agency from grazing privileges, and has,
for a time at least, settled the question of trespassing cattle. 
156 


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