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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Report of the commissioner of Indian affairs,   pp. 1-155 PDF (58.6 MB)


Page 1

REPORT 
OF THE 
COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
Washington, D. C., September 30, 1905. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith the seventy-fourth annual 
report of the Office of Indian Affairs. 
Assuming the responsibilities of the commissionership in the very 
middle of the fiscal year, I have endeavored to gather up the threads 
of the work of my immediate predecessor and weave them into a 
consistent fabric, with only such new features of design as changeful 
passing conditions seemed to demand. For whatever in this report 
bears the stamp of novelty, but has not yet earned the seal of accom- 
plishment, I shall crave your indulgence on the plea that the field 
of Indian affairs is presenting every day fresh problems for solu- 
tion, and that, there being no precedents to guide us in solving these, 
we are necessarily driven to experiment. But in order that the gen- 
eral end toward which my efforts are directed may be the more 
clearly understood, I beg respectfully to lay before you one of the 
fruits of my twenty years' study of the Indian face to face and in 
his own home, as well as of his past and present environment, in the 
form of a few 
OUTLINES OF AN INDIAN POLICY. 
The commonest mistake made by his white wellwishers in dealing 
with the Indian is the assumption that he is simply a white man 
with a red skin. The next commonest is the assumption that because 
he is a non-Caucasian he is to be classed indiscriminately with other 
non-Caucasians, like the negro, for instance. The truth is that the 
Indian has as distinct an individuality as any type of man who ever 
lived, and he will never be judged aright till we learn to measure 
him by his own standards, as we whites would wish to be measured 
if some more powerful race were to usurp dominion over us. 
I 
IND 1905 1 


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