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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1863
([1863])

Nevada superintendency,   pp. 416-419 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 416

416                  NEVADA SUPERINTENDENCY. 
NEVADA SUPERINTENDENCY. 
No. 2. 
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, 
Carson City, Nevada Territory, October 27, 1863. 
SIR: Since my return to the Territory (which was toward the close of the
month of July last) I have visited all of the more distant tribes of Indians
in 
the Territory, and have the satisfaction of reporting all the tribes quiet,
peace- 
ful, and orderly. The Shoshonees are situated on the eastern border of the
Territory, and, with the exception of two visits from this agency, have never
received much attention from the government. The reason, I suppose, is, that
it has been a mattej of doubt in whose jurisdiction they were located. In
con- 
sultation with his excellency Governor Doty, we concluded that the eastern
boundary of our Territory runs through a valley about fifty miles east of
Ruby 
valley, and nearly four hundred miles east of Carson City. The Shoshonees
are divided into several bands, three of which are under the jurisdiction
of this 
superintendency. They seem to be peaceably inclined, and are a less formidable
tribe than the Pah-Utes. All of that portion in this Territory, I am informed
by the inhabitants, have always been peaceable, and many of them are laboring
for the ranchers in the different settlements. They seem much pleased with
the treaty with them, as well as with the presents we distributed. They fully
appreciated the kindness of the government, ahid promised faithfully to observe
all of its conditions, which I believe they will do if not tempted by the
whites 
to violate them. While, a great majority of the inhabitants treat them well
and 
kindly, truth compels me to say some do not; on the contrary, incite them
to 
deeds of violence, for the double purpose of profit to themselves, by having
sol- 
diers quartered among them for the purpose of furnishing supplies, and some
for the baser purpose of weakening the government, in this hour of peril,
by 
diverting troops to this coast.away from the scenes of strife in the east.
This 
will soon be done with. The constant and rapid discoveries of new mining
regions is fast pedpling all of that portion of our country where the Indians
are 
located and roam, carrying with them always a large preponderance of those
who require and demand peace in such unmistakable terms as to compel evil-
disposed persons (such as above described) to respect their wishes. The new
and very rich discoveries at Reese river, two hundred and twejty miles east
of 
this place, re attracting much of public attention, and have already drawn
a 
population there of more than three thousana people as permanent settlers,
and 
will, before the close of another year, insure a permanent population of
ten thou: 
sand. This large settlement, in the centre of the Territory, with rich interests
to 
protect, will tend largely to insure peace with the surrounding tribes of
Indians. 
Not only at Reese river have these mineral discoveries been made, but at
many 
intermediate points, so that now short distances intervene between settlements
from the western to the eastern portion of the-Territory. The change in three
years has been wonderful, even magical. Upon inquiry, I found in Ruby val-
ley a reservation of six miles square for the Shoshonees, quite productive,
and 
capable, if improved, of going far towards supporting that portion t the
tribe 
located about it. Its natural product is grass, and hay is now worth from
seventy-five to one hundred dollars per ton in that vicinity. The last person
who had charge of it, as a real or pretended agent, was a Mfr. Rogers; he
bad 
abandoned it, or rather rented it to two persons, who pretend to hold posses-
sion under him. I informed them they must leave it, which they reluctantly
consented to do. In order to keep possession of it, and insure quiet, I appointed
a local agent, Henry Butterfield, and put him in possession of the reservation,
with instructions to hold it: The distance isso great from this where the
agent 
resides, as to render it absolutely necessary to have some one constantly
there. 
Before doing so, I consulted his excellency Governor Doty, my fellow commis-


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