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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1863
([1863])

Green Bay agency,   pp. 346-374 PDF (11.0 MB)


Page 346

346 
GREEN BAY AGENCY. 
There are many other suggestions we could make, if it would not extend our
report beyond its proper limits. 
With high regard, we are your obedient servants, 
H. B. WHIPPLE, 
Bishop of llinnesota. 
THOMAS L. GRACE, 
Bishop of St. Paul. 
THOMAS S. WILLIA.1SON. 
GREEN BAY AGENCY. 
No. 188. 
UNITED STATES INDIAN AGENCY, 
Appleton, Wisconsin, Septenber 26, 1863. 
SIR: Herewith I submit my third annual report of the progress during the
year, and the present condition, of'the several Indian tribes within this
agency. 
STOCKBRIDGES AND MUNSEES. 
In my former reports I have entered into quite an elaborate description of
the 
reservation belonging to and occupied by a portion of this tribe. I therefore
deem it unnecessary to repeat the details of formerreports. This tribe may
be considered civilized and christianized. They are all good farmers. Many
of them, if placed in an equally good position, so far as soil and farming
imple- 
ments are concerned, would compare favorably with our best farming popula-
tion. The question, then, naturally arises, Why is not this tribe able to
raise 
its own subsistence, and its own members take care of themselves? To this
I 
answer, that on their reservation of 46,080 acres there is no land which
could 
properly be denominated good for farming purposes. Some of it could yield,
in 
a very favorable season, a fair crop; but the reservation is only valuable
for its 
pine. Again: this tribe is located on the extreme confines of the unsettled
por. 
tions of this State. Thus far there has been no flouring mill within forty
miles 
of them. About them there is no demaild for labor at any season of the year,.
and hence they are driven, if they want a little money, to go to the openings
and prairies, seventy-five or a hundred miles south, where labor is in great
demand. 
These Indians know that the white man has an abundance of good land, where
he can not only gain his subsistence, but a competence; and their ambition
is 
certainly somewhat slackened when they take a survey of the not very inviting
prospect for farming on their own reservation. Last spring this tribe had
but 
very little seed wheat or oats. Of corn and potatoes they had barely enough
for 
seed. Severe fro'st's have visited this reservation every month from May
to 
September, inclusive. Their crops are not all harvested and measured, and
therefore only an approximate estimate can be submitted, which is as follows:
wheat, 300 bushels; corn, 600 bushels; oats, 250 bushels; potatoes, 900 
bushels; turnips, 50 bushels; hay, 25 tons; Hungarian grass, 13 tons. 
There are on this reservatiou seventy-three males and seventy-five females.
There are off the reservation, scattered through the northeastern counties
of the 
State, about one hundred and seventy, including both male and femal. There
are, also,-some twelve or fifteen members of this tribe who have enlisted
in our 
volunteer regiments now in the field. 
The school for this tribe has been taught during the year by Mr. J. Slinger-
land. He has been a teacher among them for many years, and is well qualified
for the place. There has been good proficiency in those scholars who have


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