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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1863
([1863])

Northern superintendency,   pp. 266-346 PDF (35.3 MB)


Page 266

266 
NORTHERN SUPERINTENDENCY. 
for the last two years, partially on account of-their expecting to move to
the 
reserve purchased of the Iowas. 
This season I commence'd an entire new plan of farming, doing away with 
the old custom of raising large crops at a great cost, and issue it :out
to 
them whenever they wanted it, and thereby encourage them in their idleness.
This year I broke their ground and prepared it for planting; then called
all 
the heads of families together, and gave each one his patch, and told them
they must work themselves, and that I would give them all the instructions
they wished, and encourage them all I could. This plan has been a partial
success, and, if strictly adhered to, will soon do away with the'necessity
of 
a farmer. In addition to assisting the Indians, I have, since the first day
of April, done all the blacksmithing, thereby dispensing with a regular 
appointed blacksmith and saved them his wages, amounting to $120 per 
quarter. 
Very respectfully, yowr obedient servant, 
MICHAEL GRIFFIN, 
Sacs and -Foxes of Mlissouri Farmer. 
JOHN. A. BURBANK, 
United States Indian Agent. 
NORTHERN SUPERINTENDENCY. 
No. 144. 
OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
St. Paul, January 27, 1863. 
SIR: I herewith transmit the annual report of Thomas J. Galbraith, agent
for the Sioux of the Mississippi. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
CLARK W. THOMPSON, 
Superintendcent of Indian Aftairs. 
Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE, 
Commissioner of Indian Afairs, Washington, D. C. 
ST. PAUL, January 27, 1863. 
The year which has just closed has been a strange and eventful one in 
the history of the agency of the Sioux of the Mississippi. It began in hope,
apparent prosperity, and tlappiness, and closed amid disappointments and
blood. 
To furnish to the government and the public a clear,just, and detailed account
of the agency for this eventful year; to set forth the causes which gave
rise 
to, and to trace the recent and, although smothered, yet existing rebellion,'
or murderous raid, from its incipiency to its present situation, although
clearly my duty, is yet an undertaking which I approach not without many
misgivings. 
The leading interests involved-the welfare of two races, the whites and 
the Indians-dictate that my report should be just, fair, and full in the
premises, and logically true in conclusions. 
The responsibility of the work, and the yet imperfect and crude state of


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