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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1863
([1863])

New Mexico superintendency,   pp. 107-121 PDF (6.4 MB)


Page 107

107 
NEW MEXICO SUPERINTENDENCY. 
or its consideration, and such action in the premises as that 1ody may deem
expedient. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner. 
Hon. J. P. USHER, 
Secretary of the Interior. 
No. 39. 
SAN FRANCISCO, March 11, 1863. 
SIR: I am informed by Adjutant General Drum that hostilities have again 
commenced at Owen's river. I beg that you will hurry up my appropriation
immediately.                    /       JNO. P. H. WENTWORTH. 
Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE. 
No. 40. 
SAN FRANCISCO, September 11, 1863. 
SIR: Please forward my funds immediately. Owen's river Indians, Tejon, 
are suffering for food. 
JNO. P. H. WENTWORTH, 
Superintendent and Agent. 
Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE, 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 
NEW MEXICO SUPERINTENDENCY.. 
No. 41. 
SUPERINTENDENCY INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
Santa Fi, New Mexico, September 19, 1863. 
SIR: I arrived in Sa33rta Fe on the 17th of July last, and immediately en-
tered upon my duties as superintendent of Indian affairs, in accordance with
your instructions of the 23d of May, preceding. 
The condition of the Territory shows that it has not fully recovered from
the 
effects of the Texas invasion. During the occupation by the insurgents all
in- 
tercourse with many of the Indian tribes was entirely broken up. The military
force was necessarily withdrawn from the frontiers to defend the Terrritory
against the invaders, and the Indians were thus left without the controlling
in- 
fluence of its presence. This at once led to evil consequences, which still
exist 
to a greater or less extent. 
The Navajoes, occupying the western portion of the Territory, were, at the
time I reached my post, at war. A campaign against them was planned, and
a force already in the field at that time under Colonel Kit Carson. 
This tribe is the most formidable of all-with which we have to deal, and
at 
no time since the aquisition of New Mexico, in 1847, has it, as an entirety,
been 
at peace. Six treaties have been held with it, at different times, by officers
of 
the government, all of which were broken before any ratification could be
effected. The tribe is now in the hands of the military department. What-
ever the causes of the war, it is too late to discuss them. The Indians by
their 


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