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Chambers, Ephraim, 1680 (ca.)-1740 / Cyclopædia, or, An universal dictionary of arts and sciences : containing the definitions of the terms, and accounts of the things signify'd thereby, in the several arts, both liberal and mechanical, and the several sciences, human and divine : the figures, kinds, properties, productions, preparations, and uses, of things natural and artificial : the rise, progress, and state of things ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial : with the several systems, sects, opinions, &c : among philosophers, divines, mathematicians, physicians, antiquaries, criticks, &c : the whole intended as a course of antient and modern learning
(1728)

Capillation - catholick,   pp. 153-172 PDF (19.8 MB)


Page 155


the Capitilars of tharlemaign, Charles the Baldj c.
ire the Laws, both Ecclefiafilcal and Civil, made by thofe
Emperors, &jc. in the General Councils, or Affemblies of
the People: which teas the way the Conflitutions of mofi
of the ancient Princes, Lec. were made; each Perfon pre-
fent, tho a Plebeian, fetting his Hand to 'em. Some dif-
tinguifh thefe from Laws; and fay, they were only Supple
flents to Laws, They had their Name, Capitularies, be-
caufe divided into Chapters or Seffions. In thefe Capliti-
laries did the whole French 5urifPrudence antiently con-
fibf. In procefs of Time, the Name was chang'd for that
of Ordonnances.
Some diifinguifh three kinds of Capitularies, according to
the Dilference of their fubject Matter: Thofe on Ecclefi-
ksiical Aflairs, are real Canons, extracHed from Councils ;
thofe on Secular Affairs, real Laws; thofe relating to par-
ticular Perfons, or Occafions, private Regulations.
CAPITULATION, a Treaty made with the Garifon,
or Inhabitants of a Place befieg'd; whereby they furren-
der themselves up, on certain Articles, and Conditions lui-
pulated between 'em. See SIEGE.
CAPITULATION, is alfo one of the Treaties of the Pac-
ta Conventa, or the Contradt drawn up by the Eleaors, be-
fore the Elefdion of an Emperor ; which the Emperor is
to ratify before his Coronation, and toobferve inviolable in
the Courfe of his Reign. Thefe Capitulations of the Em-
pire, have only been in ufe fince the Time of C1harles V.
and were occafion'd, by the Jealoufy the German Princes
entertain'd of the too great Power of the Emperor. Fre-
deric, Duke of Saxony, firnam'd the Wife, paffes for the
Author of the Imperial Capitulations; he declining the
Empire, which was offer'd him after the Death of Alaxi-
Milian, and advifing the Eledors to chufe Charles V. under
fuch Conditions as might fecure the Liberty of the Empire.
The Leopoldin Capitulation contains 47 Articles.
CAPITULUM, in Botany, the Head, or flowering Top
of any Plant; being compos'd of many Leaves and
Threads, or Stamina, clofely conneded in a globous, cir-
cular, or difcous Figure; as the Flowers of Bluebottles,
Scabious, Carduus, &,c. See FLOWER.
CAPNOMANCY, 'or CAPNOMANTIA, a kind of
Divination, us'd by the Antients in their Sacrifices: the
Rule was, when the Smoak was thin, and light, and rofe
firaight up, 'twas a good Omen; if the contrary, 'twas an
ill one.
There was another Species of Capnomancy, confiding in
the Obfervation of the Smoak rifing from POppy and Jef-
famin Seed, caft upon lighted Coals. The Word comes
from the Greek Xamrvl, Smoak; and IpcVTma, Divination.
CAPONNLERE, in Fortification, a cover'd Lodgment,
four or five Foot broad, encompafs'd with a little Parapet
about two Foot high, ferving to fupport feveral Planks la-
den with Earth. The Caponniere is large enough to main-
tain I 5 or zo Soldiers ; and is ufiually plac'd on the Extre-
mity of the Counterfcarp, having little Embrafures fre-
quently made therein.
CAPRA, She-Goat, a Conflellation in the Northern He-
mifphere, confifling of three Stars, compriz'd between the
45th and 55th Degree of Latitude. The Poets fay, 'tis
.4malthea's Goat, which fuckled Supiter in his Infancy.
Horace making mention of it, calls it, Infana Jydera Caprie.
CAPRE, or CAPER, the Bud, or Bloffom of a Shrub
of the fame Name, gather'd green, e'er it expand into a
Flower ; dry'd in a dark Place, till wither'd, then infus'd
in Vinegar; to which, at lafi, Salt is added; after which,
it is put up in Barrels to be us'd as a Pickle, chiefly in
Sauces; and Sometimes alfo in Medicine, as being very A-
pertive, and entering feveral Compofitions in Pharmacy. All
the Capers throughout Europe, are brought from  about
S  1oulon, in France; except fome fmall falt Capers from Ma-
jorca, and a few flat ones from about Lyons. The Bark of
the Caper-Tree, when dry'd, is prefcrib'd by the French
Phyficians in Oppilations of the Spleen.
CAPRL Saltantes, in Meteorology, a fiery Meteor, or
Exhalation, which Sometimes appears in the Atmofphere,
and is not fir'd in a firaight Line, but with Inflexions, and
windings in and out. See METEOR.
CAPREOLUS, in Botany, the Clafper, or Tendril, by
which the Vines, and fuch-liLe creepingPlants, fafen thetm-
felves to thofe things which are defign'd to fupport them.
'See CLAsrrxt.
CIrR.EOLATE   Plaftt, are fuch Plants as turn, wind,
and climb along the Surice of the Earth, by means of
their Capreoli, or Tendrllt5, as Gourdtk Melons, ,Cucum-
bers, Llc. See Cr.spErFs.
CAPRICoRN, in Afironomy, one of the Signs of the
X Zodiack, *a*rk'd thus V. See SIGN.
'The Antienits accounted Capricarn the zoth Sign ; and
whe the Sun arriv'd thereat, it made the Winter Solflice,
with, rArd to out Hernifpere -."But the Stars having ad-
cvan,,, a  wholeSn toard 'ile Eaflt, Cpricorn is now the
ruth Sign- and tis at the bunks Ety'into Sagitt ry; that
the Sdlfiice ha60peni thd the antient manner of fpeakini
is flill retain'd. See SOLSTICE; and PRECEs'SIO. This
Sign is reprefented on antient Monuments, Medals, Wc. ad
having the Fore-part of a Goat, and the Hind-part of a
Fish; which Is the Form of an lEgypan: fometimes, fim-
ply under the Form of a Goat.
The Stars in the Conflellation Capricorn, in 'Ptolomy'i
and Yycho's Catalogues, are 8; Mr. Flanmjead, in the fri -
tannic Catalogue, makes near double that Number, viz. 51.
The Order, Names, Longitudes, Latitudes, Magnitudes;
'Lc. whereof, are as fbllow.
Stars in the Conflellation CAPRICORN.
Namnes and Situation of   an. Lon
the Stars.
0
In the Extrem of the preced. Horn  z8
Z9
z7
The preced.Star in the fubfeq.Horn  2 9
5
The la{} of the contiguous Stars  2 9
That under the Eye              Zs
The middle Star in the fubfeq.Horn = o
Moft South.of 3 in the fubFeq.Horn V z 9
Foremoft of 3 in the Nofe     =  0
I0
North of thefe                   0
South of thofe in the Nofe       0
North of two in the Neck
More South
15
That under the upper Knee
In the lower and bent Knee
1o
Preced.andNor.of 3 in Mid.ofBody
Preced. of z in the Back
That in the Shoulder
South. in the middle of the Body
z25
Second in the middle of the Body
Subfequent
Laft of 3 in the middle of the Body
30
Subfeq. of 2 in the Back
ill of contiguous ones under Belly
Subfeq. of the fame
Preced. in South. Fin
Preced. in Root of the Tail
40
Subfeq. in South. Fin
Preced. in North Part of the Tail
Subfequent
45
North. in Extrem. of the Tail
Another, fubfequent
Middle in North. Part of the Tail
Subfeq. in Root of the Tail
50
Subfeq. in North. Part of the Tail
3
3
3
gitude.
I ,1
6 58
I I 41
z 6  i
2.7 19
2.1 44
6 56
43 57
2.3 55
5 51  9
54   lO
2.8 57
58 44
2o 53
=IZ  150
3 50
3 37
6 47
7 34
8 17
83 15
7 30
8 57
9 14
10 4z
lI 10
11 2.
I2.
' 3
I I
1 3
1 3
' 5
1 5
1 5
1 7
1 8
I'9
' 9
2.0
16
It
33
36
8
IS
IO
8
52.
37
42
40
' 9
53
0
S
19
41
I3
36
1
'39
S
2.4
916
5 5
40
46
5 :.
17
8 7
3 9
3'I
0
50
3 5
49
8
2.0
57
3 7
5 1
42.
i 6
49
S
46
0
3'1
3!I
4
'4
58
; zI 2.9 I?
Latitude.
Q   Ift
7 z7 4B
7 13 31 B
7 15 34 B
z  3z 3 A
7  I 3i B
6  8  61B
o 39 39 B
6 35 53 B
4 37 27 B
0 56 6 B
0
3
0
14
2.6
'9
l .3
' 5
6 58
3 z2.
8 S5
I 51
0 3.9
2 57
o 33
8   3
4 31
3 36
3 58
o 43
z  t
1 39
I 10
5 17
6 57
5 50
6 31
5  2.2.
5 31
4 56
L 3!
8 53
0 9
4 48
o 37
I   I
4 '3
3 56
1 57
7 32
1 38
o 39
17 B
91B
30 B
3.6 B
46 B
'3'A
o4 A
9A
l0 A
38A
43 A
oA
38A
8A
46 A
9 A
5o A
40 B
23 A
3A
13 3 A
3.6 A
36 A
27 A
45
Is
I,
56
I 8
A
A
IA
A
A
38 A
zS A
36 A
44 A
54A
5i B
38 13
2.4 B
19 A
2.4 Il
10 A
7
6
6
6
4
3
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6 7i
6 7
6
S
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
6
5
6
6
l6
6
4
4 3
6
6
5
6
6
6
6,
S
3
6
15
5
T'ropic of CAPRICORN, a lefter Circle of the Sphere,
parallel to the Equator; paffing thro the Beginning of
Capricorn. See TROPIC.
CAPRIOLE, in Horfemanlhip, the Goat-leap; is when
an Horfe, at the full Height of his Leap, jerks or firikes
out with his hind Legs as near and even together, and as
far out as he can firetch them; in which Adion, he clacks,
or makes a noife with them. The Catriole is the moft dif-
ficult of all the high Airs: There are Teveral kinds of Ca-
triolesi as, a right Capriole, back Capriole, ficde Capriole,
broke Capriole, open Capriole, &c. The Word comes from
Capreolus.
CAPSQUARES, in Gunnery, are thofe firong Plates of
Iron, which come over the Trunnions of a Gun, and keep
her in the Carriage: They are fafined by hinges to the
Paizeplate, that it may lift up and down. They form a
part of an Arch in the Middle, to receive a third Part of
the Thicknefs of the Trunnions; for two thirds of them
are let into the Carriage, and the other End is faflien'd by
two Iron Wedges, which are call'd the Forelocks, and Keys.
CAPSTAN,
i


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