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Chambers, Ephraim, 1680 (ca.)-1740 / Cyclopædia, or, An universal dictionary of arts and sciences : containing the definitions of the terms, and accounts of the things signify'd thereby, in the several arts, both liberal and mechanical, and the several sciences, human and divine : the figures, kinds, properties, productions, preparations, and uses, of things natural and artificial : the rise, progress, and state of things ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial : with the several systems, sects, opinions, &c : among philosophers, divines, mathematicians, physicians, antiquaries, criticks, &c : the whole intended as a course of antient and modern learning
(1728)

Analecta - antimony,   pp. 83-109 PDF (20.2 MB)


Page 108


( Tog )
Worms; AxiaPhroditicks, againfLut; Anti-0ieticks,
againfi the Falling Sicknefs, Lec.
ANTI, in matters of Literature, are Pieces written by
way of Anfwer, to others, whofe Names are ufually an-
nex'd to the Aavti.
See .the A.nti of N. Baillet; and the Anti-Baillet of M.
Menage. There are alfo ,Anti-Menagiana, &c.
Caefar the Didator wrote two Books by way of Anfwer
to what had been objeded to him by Cato; which he
call'd  Anti-Catones; mentioned by yuvenal, Cicero, &c.
-Vives affures us, he had feen C~efar's Anti-catones in an
antient Library.                          .
ANTIADES, a Term ufed by fome Writers for the
Glandules, and Kernels, more commonly called 71onfis
and A41ronds of the Ears.  See TONSIL, ALMOND, and
A mYGIALA, .;C.
ANTIADIAPHORISTS, ANTIADIAPHORISTJE.,thofe
oppQftte to the adiaphlrirfs. See A DIArnHoIsT.
This Name was given, in the XVIth Century,to the rigid
Lutherans, who difavoa'd the Erpifcopal Jurifi+ion, and
many of the Church Ceremonies, retain'd by the Modetate
L utherans. See Lu T hi E R A N.
The Word is compounded of the Greek tcnp contra, a-
gainfit and  'e(cpS, indif'erent.
ANTIBACCHIC, ANI1BACCHIUS, in the antient Poe-
try, a Foot, confifling of three Syllables; the two firm
whereof are long, and the third fhort. See FooT.  Such
are the Words cantare, virtute.
It is fo called as being contrary to the ZBacchic, the frfl
Syllable whereof is thort, and the two lafl long; as egeftas.
See BACC1IIC.
ANTQICARPDIUM, in Anatomy, ZYc. that Fort of the
Breaft jugt againit the Heart, commnonTy ca1ked the Pit of
the Stomach,
The Word is compounded of ctn', con2tnr againfl, and
4     Co,-, Heart.
ANTLCAHaESIS in the Civil L-.w, a Covenant or Con-
vention, whereby a Perfen botrowin3 Money of another, en-
gages, or makes over his Lands to the Creditor, with the
Ufe am1d Occupation thereof, for the Intered of the Money
lent.
This Covenant was allowed of by the Romans; among
whom Ufury was prohibited: It was afterwards call'd
Mortgage, to diffinguilh it from a finple Engagement,
where the Fruits of the Ground were not alienated, which
wascall'd Vifgage. See MORT'GA.         toeP
ANTICHTHNbES, in Geography, are thofe People
who inhabit Countries oppofite to each other.
The Word is Compounded of CiV77i contra, and X. VyX
fT'erra.               I
The Term Antichthones is now ufed in the fame Senfe
with  Antipodes; but the Antients ufed it in a different
one.-They confider'd the Earth as divided by the E-
quator into two Hemifpheres, the Northern and Southern;
and all thofe who inhabited one of thefe Hemifpheres were
reputed Antichthcnes to thofe of the other. In this Senfe
the Word is ufed by Mela and othzr antient Authors. See
AN TIPOD ES.
ANTICKS, ANTiCrI-WORiR. See AN TIQE.
ANTICIPATION, the AA of doing a Thing before
the time.-Such a Debt was not yet become due i He An-
ticipated the time of Payment.
ANTICIPATION, in Philofophy. See PRJENOTION.
ANTICOR,ANT I CO EUR orAN TOCOEUR ,or1vantCdur,
among Farriers, is ufually defcribed as a preternatural Swel-
ling, of the Size and Figure of an Apple, occafioned by a
fanguine and bilious Humour; and appearing in the Horfe's
Breaft oppofite to his Heart.
A late Author affirms, that the generality of Writers on
that Subjedt have been miflaken as to this Difeafe; attri-
buting it to the Heart, whence it is by Solleyfell, called the
Sweliing of the Pericardium; whereas it is really anInflam-
rnation in the Gullet, and Throat; and the fame that in
hLman Bodies, is called the Angina, or Squinancy.
ANTIDACTYLUS in Poetry, a Foot in Verfe, con-
trary to a fDa4yl ; confifling of three Syllables, whereof the
filr two are i-ort, andthe laft long. See DACTYL.
ANTIDATE, a fpurious Date, prior to the true Date
of a Writing Infirument, Ad, Deed, or the like.  See
DATE.C
ANTIDICOMARIANITES, or ANTIDIACOMARI-
ANISTES, antient Hereticks, who pretended that the Holy
Virgin had not preferved her Virginity, but that Ibe had
feveral Children by ,7ofefl. See VI R G IN.
Their Opinion was grounded on fome Expreffions of our
Saviour, wherein he mentioned his Brothers, and his Sifters.
-TheAntidicomarianites, were the Difciples of ifelvidius
and 7ovinian, who appeared in Raome toward the clofe of
the LVth Century..
* ANTIDILUVIAN, fometfliug before the Deluge. See
DJXLU G E.
ANT
In this Sinfij ihofe G  eratis froa Aal
Flood, are called Atidiluviaxs; and zhoe X
from Noab, to thbe prefent time, gre called I
See A CE, PATAIABrH, &8   . _  A 1. ; i  a
Dr. Burnet, and Dr. Wood   s difcr"vy
the .dntidiluvian World; the fibrmer imagines
Appearance to have been fmtoth, equablet ax
fpetts different from what we Know hid thm I
The latter on the contrary endeavours to pn
Face of the terraqueous Globe before the Del
fame as it is now, viz. unequal,diftinguifhed it
and Dales, and having likewife a Sea, Lakes,
that this Sea was falt as ours isd was fubjed t
poffefs'd nearly the fame Space and Extent that
and that the Antidiluvian World was flock'd v
Vegetables, Metals, Minerals, &c. that it II
Pofition in refpee of the Sun which ours no
Axis not being parallel, but inclined, as at pro
Plane of the Ecliptic; consequently that there
the fame Succeflion of Weather, and the fame
of Seafons, as now. See TERRAqUEOVS, Mou
See alfo FossLrS, LGc.
ANTIDOTE, a Remedy taken either to
cure, Gontagion. See PLAGUVE, CONTAG ION,
tIVE, Tec.
The Word Antidote is alfo ufed to fignify
taken to prevent the ill Effeds of fome other,
Poafon. bsee t'OISON.
I
~i
R
e
II
X
In this Senfe the Word has the fame Signification with
Alexipharmic, Alexiterial or Counterpoifon. See ALEXI-
I.APRMIC, COUNTER-POISON, &C.
The \Word is borrow'd from the Greek c914. againfi, and
.jPl, I give; as being fomething given againrf Poifon, ei-
ther by way of Medicine, or Prefervative.
ANTIENT, or ANCIENT, ufually fiands oppofed to
Modern. See MODERN.
The Word comes from the French Incien, of the a
tint Antiqus. Thus we fay the Xntient Architedture, 1~14
tient Monuments, Antienr Church. See A&CHItTECTuRE,
wc.
When we fay abfolutely, the Antients, we mean the
i&reeks and Romans-Thus, the Anttients ufed to burnz
their Dead-   The Learned have been greatly divided
of late days, with re'gard to the Preference between tho
Antients and Moderns.
ANTIENT isfometimes oppQfed to young or new-We
fay the antient Bifhop Qff ch a City, when he has refilg'e
his See, and a new one is put in his Place. The antient
Bifhop of Frejus, now Cardinal de Feury.
ANTIENTS in Church-Vifcipline. SeeELDERS.
'The Society of Grays-Inn, confifis of Benchers, i*
tients, Barriflers, and Students under the Bar: the .d
tients are the Elder. Barriflers. See INN, BARRISTER,
LfC
In the Inns of Chancery there are only, Antients and St@.
dents, or Clerks; and among the Ancients, one is yarly
the Principal, or Treafurer-In the Middle Temple,
Antients are fuch as are paft their Reading, and never
read. See TEMPLE.
ANTIENT is fometimes alfo ufed in a Military Senfefor
an Enfign. See ENSIGN.
A to 1'TINTY. in fome antient Statutes is ufed for Elkr-
#ip or Seniority-Thus the eldefi Sifter can demand
more than her other Sifters befide the Chief Mefhe, by
fon of her Antienty.
ANTIENT, is alfo the Flag, or Streamer born in
Stern of a Ship  See FLAG, SIGNAL, FeC.
ANTIENT    Lemefivc, or !DemainisaTenure, whir
all Manors belonging to the Crown in William the Cons
ror's, and St. Edward's time, were held. See TSNI
ano   Ad .
The Numbers, Names, ec. hereof were enter'd I
ConquerorinaBookcall'dDoomfdajy-Book, yet rem
in the Exchequer; fo that fuch Lands as by that Bo(
pearld to have-belonged to the Crown at that time, ai
1> -I .di4-2t qlpmormq ze._ geenDOmS-2)4w
The Tenants in Antient Demefne are of two foi
who hold their Lands frankly by Charter , the othe
py of Court-Roll, or by the Verge at the Will of td
according to the Cuftom of the Manor. See FRI
COPY-HOLD, GC.
The Advantages of this Tenure, are, a. That
holding by Charter cannot be rightfully impleade
their Manor; and when they are, may abate the
pleading the Tenure. 2. They are firee from Tol
things relating to their Livelihood and Husbandrv;
be impanell'd on any Inqueft.
Thefe Tenants held originally by plowing th
Land. plafhinb his Hedges, and the like Service;s
maintenance of his Houflhold; and it was on thi
fuch l iberties were given 'em, for which they a
A N T
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