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Perrault, Claude, 1613-1688 / Memoir's for a natural history of animals : containing the anatomical descriptions of several creatures dissected by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris
(1688)

The anatomical description of six demoiselles of Numidia,   pp. 205-202 [212] ff.


Page 205


205
                            T H E
ANATOMICAL DESCRIPTION
                           OF SIX
    DEMOISELLES
                               OF
     NUlM I D I A
     His Birdis fo called, by reafon of certain ways of Aafing that it lhas,
 T   wherein it feems to imitate the Geftures of a Woman, who affeas a
 Grace in her Walking, Obeiffances, and Danfing. This resemblance mult
 be thought to have fome reasonable ground, Seeing that for above two Thou-
 fand Years the Authors which according to our Conjeatures, have treated
of
 this Bird, have defigned itby this Particularity of the imitation ofthc
Geflurcs
 and Behaviours of Man. Arifjotle gives to it the Name of Ador or C'wmfdiar.
 Pliny calls it Parafite and Danjer. Atbenxus Names it Az'p-wi t, that is
 to fay, having humane Form, by reafon that it imitates what it fecs Men
do,
 and not becaufe that it imitates the Speech of Man like thc Parrot, as GelI.7a
 underfiands it. For Athenxwv relates the manner, which as Xenophon reports
it,
 the Fowlers make ufe of to take thefe Birds, which is by rubbing their Eves
 in their Prefence, with Water put into Vefels which they do carry away,
 leaving fuch like Veffels filled with Glue, wherewith thefe Birds do glue
their
 Feet and Eyes , when they endeavour to imitate what they -have leen other
 done.
   It is probable that this  Dan/bzg or Bruflboo  Bird, was lare amongl thie
An-
 cients, becaufe Pliny thinks it fabulous, by ranging this Animal, which
he
 calls Satyrick, amongfc the Pegafus's, Grijfrns, and dSren's. It is likewife
cre-
 dible, that till this time it was unknown to the Moderns, fRcing that they
 have not fpoke thereof as having feen it, but only as having read in the
\tui-
                                                             tings


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