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Graeve, Oscar (ed.) / Delineator
Vol. 119, No. 1 (July, 1931)

[Continued articles and works],   pp. 76-[89] PDF (9.4 MB)


Page 78

78
PRICES OF BUTTERICK PATTERNS
Including the New Deltor
Buy patterns at the nearest Butterick Agency. But if this is not convenient,
they will be sent, post free, if order is accompanied by remittance, from
the main office of the Butterick Publishing Company, Butterick Building,
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NO.    CTS.   NO.    CTS.    NO.   CTS.     NO.   CTS.    No.   CTS.     NO.   CTS.
3756... .35  3800.. .35    3844    45    3888   25     3932    35    3976.. .25
3757... .45  3801- . 35     3845.   35    3889. .45      3933.   50    3977. .. 45
3758... .35  3802. ... 45   3846.. .45    3890.. 35      3934.. .50    3978. ..50
3759... .40   3803. ..40     3847.. .35    3891... .45   3935... .45    3979. ..35
3760 ... .30  3804 ... .45   3848.  .35    3892 ... 35    3936 ... 45   3980... .45
3761... .45   3805.. .50     3849... .30   3893... .50    3937... .35   3981 ... 45
3762 ... .35  3806 .... .45  3850. ... 50  3894 ... .25   3938 ... .50  3982 ... 30
3763 ....45   3807... 35     3851 .  35    3895... 45     3939... 45    3983    50
3764 ....50   3808 ... 50    3852   . 50   3896... 35     3940 . 45     3984    35
3765 ....45   3809.. 35      3853.   30    3897... .50    3941.. .45    3985    50
3766 ... 45   3810 ... 50    3854.   35    3898.. 25      3942... 45    3986    50
3767 .... 45  3811.. .50     3855.   35    3899.. 45     3943. .35     3987    50
3.68. ... 30  3812.. .50     3856.   50    3900... 40     3944 ... 45   3988    50
3769 ... 45   3813 ... 30    3857 .  25    3901. . 45     3945    25    3989  . 45
3770 ... 50   3814 ... 45    3858.   45    3902. . 35     3946    50    3990   .50
3771 ....45   3815. . 35     3859.   35    3903... 25     3947.   45    3991   .50
3772 ....40   3816... 30     3860...40     3904. . 35     3948    35    3992 ..35
3773 ... 50   3817... 35     3861 ... .25  3905.   45     3949 . 45     3993   .45
3774 ....30   3818... 45     3862.. .45    3906. ..25     3950    35    3994    30
3775.. . .50  3819 ... 35    3863... .50  3907... 50     3951    50    3995. . . .45
3776 ....45   3820.. 30      3864. ..45    3908....35     3952    30    3996....35
3777 ....50   3821... 45     3865... .35   3909... 35     3953   .30    3997.. .45
3778 ....35   3822... .30    3866. ..35   3910. . .30    3954    45    3998... .35
3779 ... 50   3823 . . .45   3867... 45   3911... .35   3955    35    3999 .  45
37 80.... 30  3824.. .35     3868....30    3912    35     3956.   45    400. ..50
3781 ... 50   3825 ... .35   3869... .50  3913    35     3957.   35    4001... 50
3782 ... 25   3826 ... .30   3870 ... .45  3914.   45     3958    50
3783 .. 45    3827 ... 45    3871 ... 50   3915.   30     3959.   3     TRANSFER
3784 ... 50   3828. . .30    3872... .25  3916    45     3960  . 50
3785 ....50   3829    .40    3873_ .45     3917    35     3961.   30    DESIGNS
3786 ....35   3830.. 30      3874....45    3918    25     3962.   45
3787 ... 45   3831 .... 45   3875. . 45    3919    45     3963.   35    16124. ..30
3788 ... 35   3832. . 30     3876.. 35    3920    45     3964... 45    16125 . 25
3789 ....50   3833. .30      3877.. 45     3321    35     3965. ..45    16126.. .50
3790 ....50   3834... 50     3878.. 45     3922    50     3966... 30    16127.. .40
3791 .. 45   3835 ... .35   3879.. 45    3923    35     3967..  45    16128.. 25
3792... .35  3836 . ..25    3880. . 45    3924    50     3968... 35   1129.. 50
3793... .45   3837... 50     3881.. 45     3925. . 45     3969.   45    141130. .25
3794... .35   3838.   50     3882    45    3926 . 45      3970.. 35     16131.. .40
3795 ... .50  3839.   35     3883    45    3927 _25       3971.   45    16132.. .35
3796    30    3840.   45     3"84   50    3928.   45     3972.   35    16133.. .30
3797.   50    3841.   35    3.5     45    3929.   30     3973.   45    16134. .45
379S    25    3P42    4 5    3sti   35    3930    50     3974.   45    16135. 40
3709    30    343    50     387    40    3931    45     3975    35   1136   25
PRICES      IN   STERLING
ALL PATTERNS MARKED      BRITISH ISLES              NEW ZEALAND
GARMENT PATTERNS      TRANSFERS
25c                  1                  1                25c 1,3
301 I 3                                 1 3              30c 1 6
35c                  1 6                 1 6             35c 2
40C                  1 6                1 6              40c 2 3
45C                  2                  2                45c 2 6
50C                  2                  2                50c 2 6
75C                  3                  3                75e 3 8
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DELINEATOR
FOOD FOR THE TABLOIDS
Continued from page ii
THERE was something going to happen that
they called the Trial. It had to do with
papa, and Mr. Jason kept coming, and so
many people telephoned that Aunt Nellie
had the telephone taken out. If M\r. Jason
wanted to send a message to mama, he called
up Mrs. Diffendorfer. Mrs. Diffendorfer
was their best friend, mama said. But she
wouldn't let Mrs. Anable in the door.
Uncle Jesse had come from South America.
Uncle Jesse was papa's brother, and if Bon-
nie half-shut her eyes she could pretend it was
papa, which she did quite often.
Uncle Jesse took her to school every morn-
ing and every noon now. She didn't really
need him because she was a big girl now, al-
most seven, but it was nice having him. And
he came for her and brought her home twice
a (lay.
Bonnie didn't miss papa any more now
that Uncle Jesse was here.
The Trial was getting nearer. People now
came to stand and look at their house until
two policemen had to stay there all day and
scare them  off. 'Mama kept her blinds
pulled and then one morning Uncle Jesse told
Bonnie he guessed they wouldn't go to school
that day.
"Oh, why."
"It's better to stay home."
"But it isn't better to stay home. It's
worse, much worse." She was crying now.
"Poor kid," he said. "Don't fret, will you?
We'll play tiddly-winks, and I'll read to you.
We'll have a good time."
She shook her head. "No, we won't. And
I won't play tiddly-
winks, and I won't let
'ou read to me!"
She was being wicked
but she didn't care.
It was wicked of them
to keep her home
from school, home in
this old dark house
where nobody ever
smiled any more.
Screaming, she ran
out of the room and
upstairs into mama's
shadowed room.
"Bonnie!" cried
her mother.
"I don't care!" she
shrieked. "I hate
you all. I hate papa
because it's all his
fault and I hate you
ainl Aunt Nell!"
"Bonnie Kirk,"
said her mother very slowly, and sorrowfully.
Bonnie looked up through her tears.
But her mother said nothing more, just
looked at her with eyes that made Bonnie's
heart suddenly hurt.
"Oh, mama" she sobbed, and fell on to
mama's lap.
Her mother soothed her. "You were just
having a tantrum. You didn't know what
you were saying . . . Bonnie, guess who's
coming to see you this afternoon."
Bonnie looked up hopefully. "Papa?"
"Oh, darling, no . . . I'll give you three
guesses."
"Greta?" Greta was Mrs. Diffendorfer's
little girl.
'No."
Bonnie shook her head. Nobody ever
came to see her any more.
"Miss Adams." cried mama.
"Oh, mama, is she?"
"Yes. Right after school. And she's going
to bring you something."
'What?"
"Wait and see. She's coming at three.
You must be all clean and brushed."
"Yes'm."
"And now suppose you run down to Uncle
Jesse. You'd like him to read to you,
wouldn't you?"
'Yes'm. 'Mama, when does the Trial
-tart""
Mama looked surprised, but she said
quictly, "Tomorrow, darling."
'Then will you be well?"
"Don't ask for explanations, Bonnie dar-
ling. You wouldn't understand . . . I'm going
to get well as quickly as I can."
Miss Adams came at three carrying a
basket. Bonnie thought it was going to be
cookies, but it was a darling little kitty,
scrambling and scampering all over the room!
Miss Adams smiled.     "It's for you,
Bonnie."
It was a gray-and-white kitten with a small
pansy, face and round light gray eyes. Bon-
nie took it in her arms and rushed upstairs to
show mama.
"Oh, mama, can I keep it?"
"Of course, dear."
"Oh, mama, isn't she sweet?"
Tenderly she carried the kitten back down
to the living-room.
"I'm going to name her Twinkie," she
announced.
"Because when she runs her little feet
twinkle like little white stars." She put her
face down in the furry gray-and-white body.
"Oh," she breathed, "she's so little."
THE next day Uncle Jesse began going in to
New York every morning, and when he
came home he went up to mama's room and
they talked. At nights Mr. Jason came, or
another man named AIr. Toohey, a young
man with red hair, and then everybody
talked. Bonnie could hear the buzz-buzz as
she went to sleep. They were, she supposed,
talking about the Trial. But she wasn't in-
terested in those things now. She had
Twinkie.
Bonnie didn't even mind not going to
school. Besidez, school would be over in a
few days. It was June and very warm.
Mama was not leaving her room at all
these days. The doctor came every day, he
gave her something to make her sleep. And
she tried hard to eat.
She was very thin
and weak. But she
did not cry any more.
There was some-
thing cal'ed the
Verdick  that  was
coming. First there
had been the Trial,
now it was the Ver-
dick. But Twinkie
was growing. Bonnie
thought she could
almost see Twinkie
grow, and they had
learned a new game-
"Playing Toes" Bon-
nie called it. She
would get under the
bed cover and wriggle
her toes and Twinkie
-   would  crouch  and
stare, then pounce
and try to bite the
toes with her sharp little teeth.
Once in a wshile Greta Diffendorfer came
over and they played in the living-room
Miss Adams came every day too and told
Bonnie all about things at school.
BONNIE knew when the day of the Verdick
came. Nobody told her, but everything
in the house was strange and very quiet
Uncle Jesse did not go into town; he sat in
mama's room all day. Aunt Nellie dropped
things and chattered and didn't hear what
you said and kept running to the window.
M\r. Jason came late in the afternoon.
Bonnie heard him say to Aunt Nellie, "I
think he's got a chance but I don't want to
raise Mrs. Kirk's hopes too much." Then
he went upstairs and she didn't see him again
until supper.
Mr. Toohey was over at Mrs. Diffendor-
fer's sitting by the telephone waiting to get
the Verdick. Men kept ringing the doorbell;
and M rs. Diffendorfer came over and washed
the dishes and answered the doorbell and said
to the men every time, "No, no, go away."
But they stayed around the house. Some of
the men had cameras and snapped Mrs.
Diffendorfer's picture when she opened the
door.
"Come, Bonnie," said Mrs. Diffendorfer,
"time for girlies to go to bett."
The Verdick hadn't come, but Bonnie
didn't care. She didn't even want to know
what a Verdick was.
She curled up in bed with Twinkie in the
curve of her arm. Twinkie put her tiny cool
nose to Bonnie's face, purring.
"I like you, happy Twinkie," whispered
Bonnie. "I like you better'n anything in the
whole world. Aren't we very happy to-
gether, you and me?"  (Turn to page 80)


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