University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Gender and Women's Studies Collection

Page View

The ladies' home journal
Vol. XX, No. 7 (June, 1903)

Hooper, Emma M.
The girl who makes her own clothes,   p. 50 PDF (840.0 KB)


Page 50

The Ladies' Home Journal for June 1903
The Girl Who Makes Her
Own Clothes
By Emma M.1. Hooper
14         1
Cris olars for Summer
eptI   ""ally attract.ve and cnforta,..
eading stores everywhere, I5. each, 2 f -
f unable to procure them, write us ard
- that you are supplied
Book of Stylesh l.w all of the n-w cI
CORLISSCOON & CO., 42 Broadwary Troy. New York
SOMETHING NEW
CORSET COVERS
F. P. KNITTED
CORSET COVER
FITS LIKE A GLOVE. IMPROVES THE FIGURE
'' Ster Weight.
H   e ae        cittenti.,  t. 1e shape.
at -1, material. Be ached by a netret praces
ad will not shrink in washing.
1   '. -           - r-- !-  ::5.,-  11
melfast
thesh
Linen Underwear
That Wears Well
efron th-l ''i mater;a-
elablefib:- ire - ; :inen; w"'..!
he ideal form, an open n11
our own special process v.
s it wearing qualities h-'.
lacking. Has real absorb.:'
perties; takes up perspiration
idly, evaporates it just as
leaving the skin cool, <!r.
end for Samples of the
.  obric and our Free Book
all dealers, or sent dire-t by
your dealer wont supply :z.
BELFAST MESH INDEPWEAF CO.
Calfornia Ostrich Feathers
r:ATSTO0 0OS TPIrC H F AP'
.1 Ela tic Stocki g.
+ ~JU U    Thread Elastic, $2   V.
$3.0            PAP1411-iFtii
Yl.1111 S         6-4-i bndesrt  Slt
L'
%,fl
F-  L c  071  LB .-ct BOX -... OOK r
THE GODIVA
k wAIR BRUSH
SUALLY by June the girl who
is in the habit of making her
own frocks. etc., has finished
tier heavy sewing and is adding such
extras to her summer wardrobe as
neckwear, belts, a little wrap, a cool
outing gownand.perhaps.a lace waist which every
girl desires to possess.  The little things which
make a toilette complete and count for so much
need not prove expensive if girls are neat in their
--wing. know what is becoming, and can make the
pretty fancy embroidery stitches which are now so
iuch used on summer gowns and their accessories.
A tub frock for outing wear is a necessity and
e-onomy, for it saves the woolen gown that may be
ic rn late in the fall. These wash frocks are of
linen. or union linen, that has cotton in it. the latter
being from thirty-eight cents up in single width, and
he former, which is from twenty-seven to thirty-six
icies wide. from fifty cents up. No matter what
the material, make the frock an easy fit. and scald
lhe goods before making the frock to allow for the
,hrinking that is sure to follow.  Select a material
w% hich is coarse and sleazy. rather than too close and
tne. In color let it be blue or tan, checked white
and blue, white and brown, or white and black,
,r mottled something like a woolen homespun.
Such a gown should be of an Eton or shirtwaist
design with a flare skirt of five.seven or nine gores,
made with or without a pointed yoke or with plaits
stitched to within a flounce depth.  No trimming is
necessary, but bands of the goods piped with white
linen or finished with narrow white cotton braid may
b- used if desired. The lower edge of the skirt should
have a hem   protected with a skirt-binding.  If an
Eton design is chosen to wear over a shirtwaist have
it made with a plain front, large pearl buttons. no
collar. bell sleeves.and trimmed to match the skirt.
A fichu collar can be worn with this if the wearer is
,lender. If a shirtwaist is preferred have it made
with plaits in the back, and one or two box-plaifs
with large pearl buttons in front, bishop sleeves
with buttoned cuffs. stitched belt of the same, and
a white linen or pique collar or a belt and "tab"
clar of white pique.  The easy-to-be-made sets
t,, wear with wash gowns are the embroidered
"tab" or stock collars. and belts of white pique,
or of white.tan or Delft-blue linen.
The new belts have pointed ends and harness for
fancy buckles, or both ends are pointed and fastened
with a fancy brooch, the material being cut length-
wise and doubled and stitched twice on the edges.
Sometimes a second color affords a tiny bias bind-
ing on the edge, but this is not always conducive
to good results as so many " wash " colors do n'ot
wash. Remove any metal fastenings before wa-.h
ing. An inch and a quarter has been adopted a-
the most becoming width for a belt.
Black velvet belts may be worn with any wa-
gown no matter what the style of the neckwear
Silk elastic in one or two rows. ribbon pinned
front, soft girdles of silk or wide ribbon, belts w i'
a brooch pinning them low in front and a rosette a
the back, are all in vogue. Very few leather be1-
are worn. Sashes are usually of six-inch ribbni
eitlter plain or striped. drawn in folds about the
waist and tied in a hard knot at the back with twi
nt-I-. about twenty inches long.tied in a tight lnT
cc; I  'cr3.i,-.hcardi
a,*rI OO I.a    .er lrllipallae ~iciate i i,1
i;ue, or are of transparent lace or fagott-trimtdnil
All-over lace is made intocollars which are slight
1, inted on the lower edge of the front, bound all
:round with a tiny bias band of white silk and
- ctted with French knots of embroidery silk. The%
aten at the back under a rosette of white tulle
Hias strips of white or colored silk. linen or lawn.
r.t over three-fourths of an inch wide, are connectel
ith a herring-boning of heavy silk or mercerized
tton, shaped over a paper foundation and formed
to straight or pointed collars.
Piqu6 stocks are plain, straight or pointed. have
o' narrow tabs or fancifully-shaped ends in front.
r are finished with long ends that cross at the ba< k
: d tie in a four-in-hand knot.  The tabs are hld
four large or several small buttons. are trill v-c
Ith rows of let-in insertion, have scalloped edge-
"r may be entirely covered with hand embroid-ry.
Ine fancy ones doing away with the necessity for
any brooch or tie. Sets of narrow or tab linen (,l
lurs and cuffs are worn, as are sets of the fagt
,:.igns and also straight bands of heavy lace.or
'.p-tnwork embroidery insertion, with a tiny 1Ii
lawn on the lower edge.
Dainty evening wraps have lately appeared that
are merely deep round collars fitting smoothly over
the shoulders. These collars, which are of taffeta
r any black silk, form the foundation for several
fles of chiffon.  The necks are finished by flat
-ttects in black applique or cream lace.  Like the
1larless jackets the fronts are finished with two
ng scarfs of the ruffle material edged with tin
r .'hing. Others have long stole ends cut in -oj
th the collar.  These are covered and edged with
r-ffies. The ruffles are cut crosswise, knife-plait-d,
.t.-A edged with a tiny ruche to make them fluff%.
bolored scarfs are made from two widths of -ft
Ilk joined with a row of fagoting along the edge;
"'e two ends are hemmed with briar-stitching Five
ards is the correct length.  These scarfs are worn
* -esely draped around the neck, knotted once oer
chest. and afford a protection when an evening
- n or a very thin bodice is worn.
.ilk mitts can be stamped on the back and hand-
aibroidered by clever girls who have often thus
noamentedtheinsteps of silk and lisle threadhose.
The girl making her own clothes must keep her
,]red and street suits in good repair. well brushed
.nd pressed. hang her jackets on a stretcher covered
..th old muslin,fold her gloves and veils, dispense
with all cheap gewgaws and avoid all unusual
colors, if she desires to appear well dressed.
Solid back-A perfect brush
S. E. HOWARD'S SON & CO.
NEW YORK CITY
REACHES
THE
SCALP
AT
EVERY
STROKE
INFASHION                                      I
I R1 E1  r600 dIn
YOL WILLltE 13Eus':ns           crpy ta e
IF YOU USE
McCALL PATTERNS
STYLISH, ACCLRATE, SIM1PLE
16 and 15 cents each-none higher-none so good.  Sold  by
some reliable  dealer in every city and  town or by mail from
The McCall Company.  Mail Orders filled the day received.
S
McCALL
PATTERN
No. 7775A
GIRLS' DRESS
Cut in vies. 6, 7, 8. 9 an,,d  rs.
Sent with full instructiins foriak-
ing f-r 15 cents r frre oil a
years sub ri tut       ALL
HARINFELT MATTRESS!
VENTILATES ITSELF
 5       I he larinfelt is a Combination Mattress
aIt is 1orlappr m                    $   1 6-nvn5 0to, astieyinioatna
$  1 en0tly       ppot,11 !th;itar y  leepe  a S if  it I ar.t tt I
C .ar  II, rf' nt" tre  sent  xres 5s l'id tIn  tihe  Irnite  States an I
lur artisti, b, k0.  II'   cl/I  OF  SILE."  sent  n ree
THE HARINFELT COMPANY, 43 LIBERTY STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
THE IDEAL HOME AND FASHION MONTHLY
Only 50 cents a year, including a free pattern.   Circulttion
over 425;,"  ctpies every issue. The latest styles illustrated
in colors and half-tone, fiction, special articles, etc.. etc.
THE McCALL COMPANY
Designers an takrsf cth r/ eh-rated    1 MCi/ Patterns
It13-115-117 West 31st Street, New York
186-188 Fifth Avenue, Chicago              723 Market St., San Francisco
c;,   1l    ,c  cc..'         I.' cllci~
-I ;I   , , ,  , cc, , c'cveAI  I h  c,'. .
I
oodlilorse
but/he Road.
This is the age of achi evement; in-
entive genius and progressive
tnifacturing have given the
iNll gr1    Iter bon thall
The Oldsmobile
The besthin o  whJaol? eels
1 mnply constructed Automo-
.,' .et as strong aad serviceable
-e three times its weight. Ihe
t  are free  froi  all coplicatios,-
any dy wh1-1 uler-tanids a sewving machine can readily
-1r i eti gacfl   nabout. Built to 1run71and do"sit.
Price$65000      fe Oldsmobile is always ready and is equally suitable for an
Price 650.00extended touir-a round of calls or an afternoon shopping trip.
iet,  for......r illu-trted catalogue and your local nigeit's namie to Dept. 49.
OLDB MOTOR WORKS, Main Office, DETROIT MIC.
Factories: Detroit and Lansing
SOUVENIR       POSTAL CARDS 'tilAe r i c Ban.
Sceney. -~   !ilirrt,st auraIn-e-cards-frly 25c.
rs 1"i itt     , a1i. Will i,. ppcejatel lby
Ic-.  Aa aysreair i a  i Wrt'tay.
KOELLING & KLA       PENBACH, Chicago, Ill.
,;,mnR   ks a Secialty.
STAMMER
LEWIS STAMMERI   iSHOOtL 40 AdeaideSt.Detro tMich.
Page 50
Has penetrating bristles of finest quality
AND IF YOU READ
MCCALUS MAGAZINE
09
IL
- -- ------- -
I
$2.00
Everywhere, or
by Mail


Go up to Top of Page