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Woman's home companion
Vol. LXIV, No. 6 (1937)

[Title page] Woman's home companion - June 1937 - Vol. LXIV, NO. 6,   pp. 2-3 PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 2

Irow.0,
A Surgeon's Dream
t-N A WOMAN we know had symptoms which, from
IVwhat she had heard of other cases, might mean
cancer. Instead of trying to make herself forget them
and saying nothing, as all too many women do, she
went straight to her doctor. He sent her to a surgeon
who, after careful examination, said seriously, " Your
case is a surgeon's dream." He went on to explain that
while she did indeed have a cancer condition, she had
come to him so early that it was almost certain that she
could be cured, and so completely that the cancer would
never return. An operation was necessary. When it was
all over and the patient was pronounced entirely well,
the surgeon repeated his original statement with great
satisfaction.
There are thousands of women now alive and well
who have had cancer and have been cured. In almost
every case the cure was due to early discovery and treat-
ment. Each year nearly one hundred and fifty thousand
people die of cancer. There are half a million cancer
cases in this country today. And half of these could be
cured, now. "Early cancer is curable. Fight it with
knowledge," is the slogan on which the "women's
field army" has been making its drive this spring. It is
fitting that women should lead in this great fight; for,
as an official announcement says, "the cancer death rate
is higher for women than for men, and the two types of
cancer that strike women hardest are curable in seventy
per cent of the cases if taken in time." And it was a
woman, Madame Curie, who discovered one of the
strongest weapons against cancer-radium.
The danger signals of cancer are:
I. Any persistent lump or thickening, especially of
the breast.
2. Any irregular bleeding or discharge from any body
opening.
3. Any sore that does not heal-particularly about
the tongue, mouth or lips.
4. Persistent indigestion.
5. Sudden changes in the form or rate of growth of a
mole, wart or wen.
If you have any of these symptoms, see a doctor at
once. Remember, with hope and courage, that early
cancer is curable.
As Big as All Outdoors
CONSERVATION has been a fighting word in this
rVcountry ever since the days of Tneodore Roosevelt.
The fight used to be about such straight and simple
issues as saving the forests from reckless cutting and
saving wild game from the guns of ruthless hunters.
But year by year the problem of conservation grows
more serious. Dust storms and floods have given sud-
den and tragic proof that we have to save not only the
beauty of trees and lakes and streams, but the very soil
by which we live. The conservation fight has become
as big as all outdoors.
The urgency of it was shown at the recent Wild Life
Conference where a thousand delegates met in what ob-
servecs called almost a religious fervor. They are re-
solved to save the resources of America. Having set up
a federation which already represents more than three
million American citizens, they plan to draw into alli-
ance thousands of other organizations with a total
membership of thirty million. They chose again as
their fighting president our old friend J. N. Darling, the
cartoonist, familiarly known as ''Ding." He made at
the conference an eloquent appeal for action. He
2
showed that conservation is not a matter of some vague
indefinite future, of taking thought for the generations
to come. We need it now. Unless we check the loss of
our soil, he said, our standard of living will begin to go
down in less than twenty-five years-that is, within the
lifetime of the present generation. By 1961 the increase
of population and the destruction of soil, if it continues
at its present rate, will have brought us down to just
three acres of tillable land per person, and that is the
least on which we can maintain the American standard
of living. "After that," says Mr. Darling, "we head
down to the level of the Chinese. . . . Coming closer
to home, there is Yucatan, a nextdoor neighbor, which
had a civilization that ranked next to ours, but which
died and left decaying relics because it did not harbor its
resources of land, water and the gifts of nature. Soil
erosion, the same kind of soil erosion that is responsible
for our dust bowls in America today, killed the Mayan
civilization. . . .
"This continent is not inexhaustible in its resources,
though the great mass of our people fail to realize it as
vet. In the last two hundred years we have made more
inroads on our resources than has any other existing
people on the face of the globe. And our own generation
has been responsible for most of the destruction."
Already we have lost by wind and water one hundred
million acres of once good crop land, and this land is
blowing and washing away at the rate of two hundred
thousand acres a year. There is no problem before this
country so great as this, for it goes to the very root of
life itself. Conservation will continue to mean the say-
,ng of the wild life, but along with that now goes the
vast and paramount duty of saving the goodness of the
land on which human life depends. There's a fight
that's worth everything you can give it. If your chance
to join it has not come already, it will, sooner or later-
for you are one of the thirty million who must help to
win it.
Never Too Old to Learn
4   ALTHOUGH it has been said that to make a cello
player you ought to start in the cradle, we know a
man who is taking it up from the bottom, which we
suppose is the low C string, at the ripe age of forty plus.
Another fellow we know spends his evenings studying
Russian for relaxation, and there is the dentist who
studied Chinese between grindings. There are now in
this country twenty-three million adults-more than
one fourth of all the adults-who are enrolled in regular
classes for some sort of education. Nearly fifty thou-
sand of these are women taking correspondence courses
sponsored by the best universities and given by able
college professors. The average course of this sort con-
sists of from ten to sixteen lessons and costs from as
little as three to as much as forty dollars. The course
usually calls for an hour of study each week. Criticisms
are sent back on each completed lesson and specific
questions are asked and answered. It is not unreason-
ably claimed that the correspondence student actually
gets more individual attention from the teacher than
does the average student in a classroom.
Such is the heritage of the lyceum and the Chautau-
qua. The thirst to know has parched American throats
since the first logs were felled on the clearings. As the
plow laid open the sod of the prairie, the roof-beam of
the schoolhouse was lifted into place. While blast
furnaces roared, colleges reared their towers. And now
millions are eagerly seizing new-found opportunity and
facilities newly offered to fill their leisure with eager
effort, and to deepen their daily satisfactions.
'I'
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T
BLISHED MONTHLY BY
THE CROWELL
PUBLISHING
COMPANY
PUBLISHERS OF: COLLIER S
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE
WOMAN S HOME COMPANION
HE COUNTRY HOME MAGAZINE
AT SPRINGFIELD, OHIO, U. S. A.
LEE W. MAXWELL
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THOMAS H. BECK
President
ALBERT E. WINGER
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JOHN S. BREHM
FRANK BRAUCHER
CHARLES J. BEVAN
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DENIS O'SULLIVAN
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Secretary
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I
tr
J UNE 1937
VOL LXIV*-t N06


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