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Graeve, Oscar (ed.) / Delineator
Vol. 118, No. 6 (June, 1931)

[Continued articles and works],   pp. 40-44 PDF (3.0 MB)


Page [42]

cranberry with turkey
jelly with duck
mint with lamb
SO...
mix a salad dressing appropriate to the salad
FOR GREENS
Simple greens served between the meat course
and dessert at dinner, respond most readily to
a tart dressing such as French Dressing, Bach-
elor Club or Vinaigrette Dressing.
FOR FRUITS
Fruits, fresh or canned, with a more pronoun-
ced flavor than the simple greens, call for a
dressing less sharp. With perhaps a dash of
sweetnessor the tang ofcheese,or the richnessof
nut to encourage the fruits to give back their sun-
shineand full fresh flavors.FruitDressing,Cheese
Dressing,Nut Dressing or Bar-le-Duc Dressing.
SEAFOODS
If your salad is to be the main part of the meal,
for luncheon let us say, and boasts of the full
flavors of lobster, crabmeat or shrimp, marinate
first and just before serving add Lemonaise
(mayonnaise made with lemon juice).
So MANY different things, under the guiding hand of the clever cook, come to the
table as salads. Each one has its own flavor, and there is a right dressing for each
kind of salad. If you are interested we'll send you a book showing more ways to fix salads,
new dressings, and new ways to serve them; address WESSON OIL & SNOWDRIFr PEOPLE,
210 Baronne St., New Orleans, La.
One teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth teaspoon of pepper, one teaspoonful of
sugar, a little paprika, twelve tablespoonfuls of Wesson Oil and three table-
spoonfuls of vinegar. Beat with a fork until thoroughly blended. Stir into the
mixture a small sour pickle chopped fine and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley.
One teaspoonful of salt, one-eighth teaspoon of white pepper, one-quarter
teaspoon of paprika, six tablespoonfuls of Wesson Oil, two tablespoonfuls of
lemon juice and six tablespoonfuls of a jelly that is not too firm . . . such as
Bar-le-Duc. Beat the mixture with a fork until thoroughly blended.
Mix twelve tablespoonfuls of Wesson Oil and three tablespoonfuls
of vinegar. Add a teaspoonful of salt, one-quarter teaspoon of
pepper. Mix with the fish and set aside in the refrigerator for several
hours. Serve with Lemonaise (mayonnaise made with lemon juice).
SS
Oil
Oil          T
7''
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S
ON
OI L
J~A~
JUNE, 1931
DE L IN E A TOR


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