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Graeve, Oscar (ed.) / Delineator
Vol. 119, No. 1 (July, 1931)

[Continued articles and works],   pp. 46-71 PDF (15.7 MB)


Page 70

70
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DELINEATOR
THINK ON THESE THINGS
Continued  from  page  33
in this wide and varied country of ours. We
are planning some special work with these
different mixing machines, and sometime you
will hear all about that, too.
This new arrival is a particularly sturdy-
looking machine, and very attractive too.
We wanted to try it right away so we mixed a
cake for an oven test that was to be run, and
the mixing machine worked beautifully. This
machine will be used daily in the kitchen,
then later it will have sundry tests made on
it in the engineering laboratory, and finally
will be put on an endurance test. Then we
shall feel sure of its durability as well as its
convenience and its general construction.
Just across the hall a long, shallow cup-
board-like affair is being fastened to the door
between the laundry and the kitchen. De-
signed and built by us around the equipment
it is to hold, it is only five and a half inches
deep, and twenty-eight inches wide, but it
contains all the cleaning equipment except
the vacuum cleaner and the floor polisher.
These two items need a deeper space, and
since they are used almost entirely in the
front part of the house it is most convenient
to have a small closet for them there. But
here in the kitchen closet is everything needed
in caring for the service rooms of the house.
Oh, yes, except the mop-pail. That does
have to find another corner. We found it so
annoying to get things out of a deep, crowded
closet that we worked out this plan for a shal-
low one to fasten either to the back of a door
or on a wall. Quite often there is space in the
hall or back entry for such a closet as this. It
can be made right in the wall or in a door
when the house is being built, and this saves
in space the thickness of the wall or door. If
a space in the wall is used little else is
needed.
And this is only the beginning. The rest of
th- story will have to come along a little at a
time. Each month there will be a chapter
telling you some of the interesting facts we
learn in working with the new appliances.
There always seems to be something new to
tell about, new ways of using old things, if
nothing more, and the woman of today is
just the one for whom to write these pages
She is interested to know what is going on.
She is of such stuff as progress is made.
LITTLE ANNIE
Continued from page 14
Across a table in a richly furnished dining-
room, he faced her waggishly.
"You're worth ten thousand a year, little
Annie. Never forget that. You must learn
to look like it."
She was afraid to remove her gloves lest
the waiters should see her roughened hands.
"Ten thousand dollars! That's a lot, Air.
Ralph. Your pa and ma paid me ten a month
when first they hired me."
"Ah, but we've gone a long way since then."
"I remember, Mr. Ralph, when I uster
make your pants out of your ma's old skirts."
Young Mr. Nesbit wasn't a bit annoyed
by the reference. He leaned towards her, en-
couraging her to be reminiscent.
From the start she'd had the suspicion that
this display of equality was leading up to
something.
"What do you intend to do now you're a
rich woman?" he asked casually.
"Stay on in the old 'ouse," she was pre-
paring to answer, when he cut in ahead of
her with suggestions for her future. She
would be able to take things easy. She could
return to England, for instance. She could
rent an apartment in Judah and hire a little
maid. If she longed for adventure, she could
make a trip to Europe with a conducted
party.
"Might pick up a husband in Paris," he
winked at her.
She read his game at last. He was pushing
her out of his life-disowning responsibility
for her. His pa hadn't put her in a trust or
whatever they' called it. He'd managed her
affairs. But then that had been different;
she and his pa had been dear friends. She
felt loneliness creeping through her marrow
like the first chill of influenza. Beyond mem-
bers of the Nesbit family, there wasn't a soul
to whom she meant anything or who meant
anything to her. They were doing this be-
cause she was old. She longed to protest that
she wasn't; she had twenty years of work left
in her. She glanced at her smiling host, so
amused by her, so dapper. Pride sprang to
her defense. He shouldn't guess what she
suffered. She tore off her gloves.
"A 'usband! Me pick up a 'usband! Not
if 'e saw my 'ands."
Air. Ralph instantly recognized that for
imparting the rest of his news he must select
a place less public.
"I have an engagement." He consulted his
watch. "You must excuse me. Order any-
thing you fancy. I'll give the head-waiter
instructions to charge it to my account."
She had eaten nothing. She had no appe-
tite for sampling luxuries. Without a sponsor,
she felt an interloper. Shuffling to her feet,
she returned home by trolley and sought
refuge in her kitchen.
Her dear friend's children were trying to
get her out of the house. Out of the house
didn't matter so badly; out of her kitchen was
the desolation that appalled her. A kitchen
was the only home she'd ever had. In this
one she'd sat and rocked away her leisure for
years unnumbered. By every law of justice
it belonged to her. She was worth how much?
A quarter of a million. Very well, she would
offer to buy it from them.
Two days passed in suspense. On the
third Air. Ralph, in the r6le of good Samari-
tan, put in an appearance. Before he could
say a word, she overwhelmed him.
"I'll pay you for it."
"For what?"
"The 'ouse. Not that I care about the
louse. You can 'ave it, if I can keep my
kitchen."
"But to buy the house would take half of
what you possess and leave you nothing for
up-keep. Besides, those gentlemen at the
bank wouldn't let you."
"I'm not asking them," she retorted
grimly. "It was you as put me in a trust."
"But I'm not treating you badly. I'm
doing the best I can for you."
He entered into explanations, finishing
with the information that the house was
going to be pulled down. The ground was
already sold. Apartments were to be run up
"When must I go?" she asked, stunned into
resignation.
"In the next few days," he faltered.
"No. Now." She gulped. "Get it over."
"Perhaps it would be wise," he agreed with
alacrity. "But I'm sorry, little Annie, that
you feel so cut up."
" 'Ow I feel don't seem to matter."
She turned her back that he might not see
her tears, and trundled away to pack.
AS SHE stuffed her few belongings into suit-
casesand the little nail-studded immigrant's
trunk, she wondered what on earth was to
become of her. Mr. Ralph solved the prob-
lem; he had taken rooms. He would drive
her to them and help her to settle. He was
sincerely concerned for her distress. She
hardly recognized whither he was con-
ducting her, till she found herself again en-
tering The President Grant Hotel. She
drew back in Panic, but he caught her arm.
"It's all right. You can afford it; and I've
paid in advance."
Having procured her key, he accompanied
her into the elevator. On the way up, feeling
how she clung to him, he assured her, "I
won't leave you till you're comfortable. No
one will do you any' harm."
It wasn't the harm she was afraid of; it was
the solitariness.
He tipped the chambermaid on her floor,
the bell-boy, everybody.
"See you take good care of her," he com-
manded.
On the point of forsaking (Turn to page 76)
I ............... "
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