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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1950. National security affairs; foreign economic policy
(1950)

United States policy at the United Nations with respect to the regulation of armaments and collective security: the international control of atomic energy; regulation of conventional armaments; efforts to implement article 43 of the United Nations charter by placing armed forces at the disposal of the Security Council,   pp. 1-125 PDF (51.4 MB)


Page 17


REGULATION OF ARMAMENTS
part of a more general relaxation of tensions. If it were decided that
the present use policy of the Defense Establishment cannot be revised,
in the absence of convincing evidence of a change in U.S.S.R. attitudes
such as would be implied by an acceptance by them of approximately
the present U.N. proposals for international control of atomic energy,
the reasons therefor could be clarified and our public stance made
less confusing.
1O Files': US/AEC/50
Memorandum     of Conversation, by Mr. Charles H. Russell, Adviser,
              United States Mission at the United Nations
SECRET                                 [NEW YORK,] January 17, 1950.
Subject:   Atomic Energy; Six Sponsoring Powers, 14th Meeting,
     Jan. 19, 1950.2
Participants: General McNaughton, 3Mr. Arnold Smith,4 Major
                  Pierce-Goulding,5 Canadian Delegation
                Dr. Wei,6 Chinese Delegation
                M.   Chauve1,7   Baron    de  la  Tournelle,8   French
                  Delegation
                Sir Alexander Cadogan, Mr. Laskey,9 United Kingdom
                  Delegation
                Mr.. Ross,'0 Mr. Osborn, Mr. Russell, United States
                  Mission
  Master Files of the Reference and Documents Section of the Bureau of
International Organization Affairs, Department of State.
  2 On November 4, 1948, the General Assembly adopted Resolution 191(III),
which approved the plan developed by the U.N. Atomic Energy Commission,
stating that it constituted "the necessary basis for establishing an
effective
system of international control of atomic energy." The resolution also
requested
the six sponsors of General Assembly Resolution 1 (I) of January 24, 1946,
estab-
lishing the U.N.A.E.C. (United States, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, France,
China, and Canada), to consult In order to determine if, in view of their
pre-
vailing lack of unanimity (the Soviet Union was unable to accept the ULnited
Nations plan), there existed a basis for agreement on international control.
For
the text of Resolution 191 (111), see Foreign Relations, 1948, vol. i, Part
1, p. 495.
For documentation on the meetings of the six sponsors during 1949, see ibid,
1949, vol. i, pp. 419 ff.
   General A. G. L. McNaughton, Canadian Representative to the U.N. Atomic
Energy Commission.
  'Principal Adviser, Permanent 'Canadian Delegation to the United Nations.
  5Major T. L. C. Pierce-Goulding, Adviser, Permanent Canadian Delegation
to
the United Nations.
  6 Dr. Hsioh-ren Wei, Alternate Chinese Representative to the U.N. Atomic
Energy Commission.
  7Jean Chauvel, Permanent French Representative at the United Nations;
Representative to the U.N. Atomic Energy Commission.
  8 Guy de la Tournelle, Alternate French Representative at the United Nations;
Alternate Representative to the U.N. Atomic Energy Commission and to the
Commission for Conventional Armaments.
  9ID. S. Laskey, Adviser, Permanent British Delegation -to the United Nations.
  o John C. Ross, Deputy United States Representative to the Security Council;
Acting Deputy Representative to the U.N. Atomic Energy Commissi~on from
January 31,1950.
17


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