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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1947. General; The United Nations
(1947)

United States interest in international economic collaboration for the expansion of world trade and employment: negotiations at Geneva leading to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and to the convening of the Havana conference,   pp. 909-1025 PDF (44.4 MB)


Page 966


966
FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1947, VOLUME I
  At the Monday morning session Sir Stafford Cripps was informed;
by Mr. Clayton that the United States, in view of economic conditions
generally prevailing in the U.K., would not insist upon complete elimi-
nation at this time of all Empire preferences. However, there are
certain preferences which must be reduced or eliminated. In the case
of the others we would be willing to accept a commitment to reduce-
them gradually; a percentage each year so that by the end of a speci-
fied period of time the preferences would be completely eliminated..
  Mr. Wilcox informed the United States Delegation that Mr. Clay-
ton reminded Sir Stafford Cripps at the meeting on Saturday that.
the offers made by the U.K. to the United States in tariff negotiations-
were inconsequential; in fact they amounted to nothing more than
token offers. Sir Stafford was told bluntly that the United States ex-
pected the U.K. to improve substantially their offers to the United,
States in order to bring them more nearly in a quid pro quo relation-
ship to the offers made by the United States to the United Kingdom.
The offers made by the United Kingdom to the United States do not
offer a basis for negotiation. Mr. Clayton pointed out that the United.
§tates had offered 50 percent reductions in our tariff duties on nearly
all products of importance in the export trade of the United Kingdom.
to the United States. In return, the U.K. had made practically no offers
worth considering on products of importance in the export trade of
the United States to the United Kingdom. In reply Sir Stafford said
that the U.K. had gone as far as possible in its offers to the United
States. He remarked that while it might be true that on a statistical
basis the offers made by the U.K. to the United States were inconse-
quential, nevertheless, if the U.K. offers were reasonably considered.
from the point of view of the greater economic strength of the United.
States, and the tremendous increase in the volume of the foreign trade,
of the United States due to the war, the offers made by the U.K. to the
United States compare favorably to those made by the United States to,
the United Kingdom. Sir Stafford noted that if the United States is
dissatisfied with the offers received from the United Kingdom, and if
the United States feels that the offers made by the United States to
the United Kingdom are superior to those made by the United King-
dom to the United States the only way that he sees open to bring them
into line with each other is for the United States to withdraw some of
the offers made to the United Kingdom, and to withdraw the extent
of concessions offered to the U.K. In fact, Sir Stafford invited the
United States to do so.
  [Here follows discussion of other subjects.]


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