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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. The British Commonwealth, Europe, Near East and Africa
(1937)

Morocco,   pp. 858-880 PDF (8.5 MB)


Page 880


FOREIGN RELATIONS, 19 3 7, VOLUME II
  2. I was informed that the Foreign Office wishes to furnish us with
full information at once as to their negotiations with the French. This
they cannot do without the consent of the French, which was requested
of the French delegates when they were here. According to the
Foreign Office, the reaction of the principal French delegate was not
unfavorable but the British were informed definitely that the French
delegates had no authority to give such permission and would have
to consult with St. Quentin 42 in the French Foreign Office. Whether
a reply will be received to this request before the negotiators meet
again in Paris at the end of next month is, of course, uncertain.
  3. Murray's letter of December 13 43 and enclosures. The Foreign
Office states that they envisage eventually the conclusion of an agree-
ment with Spain for the abolition of capitulatory rights in the Span-
ish zone in the form of a convention parallel to the one negotiated
with France. The Foreign Office concurs in general with the views
expressed by Murray in his letter of December 13 to Mr. Maxwell
Blake to the effect that the convention with France in no way affected
the Spanish or Tangier zones of Morocco and that, with respect to the
Spanish zone, an entirely separate agreement with the Spanish Gov-
ernment would be necessary.
  4. The information contained in the Department's instruction 2065,
December 14, was communicated orally to the Foreign Office, for which
they expressed appreciation.
                                                         JOHNSON
 42 Doynel de Saint-Quentin, Assistant Secretary General In the French Foreign
 Office, subsequently appointed Ambassador to the United States.
 4 Not printed.
880


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