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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. The British Commonwealth, Europe, Near East and Africa
(1937)

Iran,   pp. 718-766 PDF (18.1 MB)


Page 728


FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1937, VOLUME II
to the proposal of sending a special mission to Iran and the Depart-
ment has regarded the matter as closed. Developments since that time
have tended to confirm the Department in its belief that such a mis-
sion would serve no useful purpose. You will therefore discreetly
discourage any contrary suggestions from Government officials.
  As for the matter of the reopening of the Iranian Legation in
Washington and the rank of our representative in Iran you may inform
competent officials of the Iranian Government that this Government
has no objection to the reopening of the Legation by a Charge
d'Affaires and that the Department will recommend the appointment
of an American Minister to Teheran as soon thereafter as practicable.
The Iranian Government is doubtless aware that nominations by the
President of Ministers and Ambassadors require confirmation by the
Senate and that this procedure necessarily entails at times a certain
amount of delay.
  You may add that this Government of course assumes that His
Majesty will in due time, in order that his prestige in the United
States may not be lessened, wish to be represented in Washington by a
full envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary.
                                                           HULL
RESUMPTION BY IRAN OF DELIVERY OF SECOND CLASS MAIL FROM
THE UNITED STATES AFTER FURTHER INQUIRIES BY THE UNITED
STATES'16
891.711/38
     The Charge in Iran (Merrian) to the Secretary of State
                            [Extracts]
No. 1003                             TEHERAN, February 26, 1937.
                                              [Received April 2.]
  SIR: I have the honor to acquaint the Department with further de-
velopments concerning the delivery of second-class mail matter in Iran.
The situation is very confused at the moment, but an attempt will be
made to give as accurate an account of it as now seems possible.
  Speaking by and large, the Legations at Teheran have received but
little mail if any of this kind since early in January, and what has
been received gives evidences of having been opened and censored.
Until recently nothing came through at all, but no one was especially
concerned because the passes to the west and to some extent to the
north were blocked for several weeks. As soon as the roads were
reopened, however, it soon became obvious that some other explanation
was required.
16For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1936, vol. iII, pp.
375 ff.
728


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