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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. The British Commonwealth, Europe, Near East and Africa
(1937)

Germany,   pp. 319-405 PDF (32.6 MB)


Page 348


FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1937, VOLUME II
in their declaration that under no circumstances would they take
definite action until they were presented with definite confirmation
of this belief from the appropriate authorities in Washington. Mr.
Gilbert once again took the opportunity to make the Embassy's
position clear, repeating the observations already consistently con-
veyed to Mr. Archdeacon. While they expressed recognition of this
attitude, the German officials said that it would be appreciated if the
Embassy would transmit to the Department for background purposes
it description of the negotiations thus far undertaken and of the
German Government's position which they had thus informally ex-
plained. At their suggestion, a copy of Dr. Landwehr's reply to Mr.
Archdeacon's memorandum was given by him to the Embassy.
  It is hoped that the Department will agree with the line followed
by the Embassy in this matter. In view of the circumstances out-
lined above, any information concerning the course of developments
in Washington would be most helpful and it would be appreciated if
the Department should find it feasible to give the Embassy the bene-
fit of its reaction.
  Respectfully yours,                         WILILTAM E. DODD
NEGOTIATIONS FOR A SETTLEMENT OF THE DRIER CLAIM AND THE
SABOTAGE CLAIMS OF THE UNITED STATES AGAINST GERMANY'"
462.11L5232/830
    The German Ambassador (Luther) to the Secretary of State
                          [Translation]
                                     WASHINGTON, April 5, 1937.
  MR. SECRETARY OF STATE: I have the honor to communicate the fol-
lowing to you by direction of my Government:
  In connection with an inquiry of the State Department, the Ger-
man Embassy in Washington informed the State Department on June
17, 1936,35 that the German Government, for which the Foreign Office
was acting, entertained the wish to conduct negotiations, apart from
the proceedings now pending before the German-American Mixed
Commission, in which the so-called sabotage cases are involved. In
that connection it was stated that the American negotiators to be sent
to Germany would be welcome to the Foreign Office and the other
German Government offices concerned. Thereupon the American
Government sent its Agent before the Mixed Commission, Mr. Robert
  '4 Continued from Foreign Relations, 1936, vol. ii, pp. 256-284.
  "Memorandum of conversation held in the Department June 17, 1936,
not
printed.
348


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