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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. The British Commonwealth, Europe, Near East and Africa
(1937)

Canada,   pp. 160-199 PDF (14.9 MB)


Page 188


FOREIGN RELATIONS, 19 3 7, VOLUME II
the Foreign Secretary today with a copy of the memorandum con-
tained in your 406, November 16, 4 p. m., and at the same time made
the suggested plea. All arrangements had been made to comply with
the Department's instruction 'in company with' the Canadian High
Commissioner; at the last moment his office telephoned the Embassy
that 'a question had arisen on a matter of procedure which made it
impossible for Mr. Vincent Massey to keep the appointment'." For
full text of telegram No. 552, see Foreign Relations, 1936, volume I,
p. 700.]
711.428/2051a: Telegram
  The Acting Secretary of State to the Ambassador in the United
                      Kingdom (Binghaum)
                            WASHINGTON, January 13,1937-7 p. m.
  9. My 406, November 16. Department is informed that the S. S.
Thorland is preparing to leave England within a few days, possibly
by January 15th. Please again endeavor to secure a reply from- the
British Government to representations made in November.
                                                          MooRS
711.428/2052: Telegram
The Ambassador in the United Kingdom (Bingham) to the Secretary
                            of State
                               LoNDON, January 14, 1937-6 p. m.
                               [Received January 14-4: 09 p. m.]
  19. Department's 9, January 11 [13], 7 p. m. Foreign Office in-
forms the Embassy that though they have not yet received replies
from all of the interested departments the Ministry of Agriculture
and Fisheries has written to them in substance as follows.
  The anxiety of the United States Government is appreciated. The
good results achieved by the convention of 1930 should not be ad-
versely affected by the activities of fishing vessels sailing under the
flags of states which were not parties to that convention since in the
opinion of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries that convention
was conceived on thoroughly sound lines. As regards the expedition
of the Steamship Thorland to these waters a member of the Foreign
Office who owns the vessel called at the Ministry and it emerged from
the ensuing conversation that owners of the vessel are aware of the
provisions of the convention and that it is intended that the vessel
shall conform to all the regulations made under the convention. In
the circumstances there would appear to be very little risk of damage
188


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