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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States diplomatic papers, 1937. The British Commonwealth, Europe, Near East and Africa
(1937)

United Kingdom ,   pp. 1-135 PDF (51.1 MB)


Page 95


UNITED KINGDOM
INFORMAL DISCUSSIONS REGARDING PROPOSED RESTRICTION OF
TRADE BETWEEN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND TO BRITISH
SHIPPING "
811.71247H/81
             Memorandum by the Secretary of State
                                     [WASINGToN,] May 18,1937.
  The British Ambassador came in upon my invitation and I stated to
him the substance of the New Zealand shipping question or con-
troversy. I suggested that I considered it very important, for the
sake of teamwork between the governments dealing with the matter,
that the Government of New Zealand should not put into operation
the discriminatory shipping authorization already enacted. I said
that this should not be done pending full and elaborate conference be-
tween the proper governmental agencies with respect to the broader
phases of the shipping situation, especially on the Pacific; that unless
this should be done our shipping officials might unintentionally get
at cross purposes in some ways, while thus working more or less in the
dark as to the ultimate plans and purposes of New Zealand, for ex-
ample, and that this especially would be true if New Zealand should
place this discriminatory policy in operation without further delay.
  The Ambassador replied that he doubted whether New Zealand
would expressly commit herself on the matter; that this was a club
she has in her hand which, as to the use of, in his opinion, she would
not commit herself in advance; but that he felt entirely satisfied there
would be no purpose to put this discriminatory legislation into opera-
tion pending any conferences, discussion, and consideration by the
proper governmental agencies looking towards a mutually satisfac-
tory settlement. I replied that was all that could be expected in the
circumstances.
  I am satisfied the Ambassador will emphasize to his government the
view that they should not permit this legislation to be carried into
effect pending further and broader consideration of shipping rela-
tions between our different countries and, if possible, satisfactory
agreements upon policies, etc.
                                               C[ORDnIZ] H[ULL]
811.71247H/85
         The British Embassy to the Department of State
             SHIPPING SITUATION IN THE TASMAN SEA
  It is understood that the Chairman of the United States Maritime
Commission 98 considers that the Australian Bill in its present form
9 Continued from Foreign Relations, 1936, vol. i, pp. 706-716.
  Joseph Kennedy.
95


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