University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Foreign Relations of the United States

Page View

United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, 1920
(1920)

Haiti,   pp. 760-853 PDF (33.4 MB)


Page 790

790
FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1920, VOLUME II
The Legation of Haiti at Washington was instructed to deliver a
note on the subject to the Department of State.24 And in that note
the Haitian Government, in order once more to give evidence of its
desire for harmony and understanding with the American Govern-
ment, repeated what it has always stated when writing to the Ameri-
can Legation. namely, " that it is ready to entertain and discuss with
the Government of the United States any amendment or objection
to any of the clauses of the law."
2. Law returning to, Germans their segquestrated property
The American Legation probably means by that the law creating
the Office of Compensation and Verification.
The law was introduced under section 3 of part X of the Treaty
of Versailles, and was communicated to the Legation of the United
States, which declared it had no objections to offer. The Council
of State, however, in its vote on the law added two new articles
to the bill that had been placed before it. The Department of For-
eign Affairs immediately, by note of July 17, 1920, acquainted the
Legation of the United States with the two additions made by the
Council of State, and drew its attention to article 63 of the Consti-
tution which sets the time limit within which the President of the
Republic may exercise his right to veto a law that has been passed.
On July 21 the American Minister wrote to the Department of
Foreign Affairs informing it that as the law was of very great in-
terest to the American Government, he had cabled the text of the
two articles for instructions thereon, and that pending the receipt
of instructions, the American Legation asked that the law be not
promulgated.
Having heard nothing further up to August 10, the Department of
Foreign Affairs again wrote to the Legation of the United States
advising it that under article 64 of the Constitution the law must
be promulgated if, within the time specified by article 63 of the
Constitution, the President of the Republic had not exercised his
right of veto.
The United States Legation's answer to that further communica-
tion was that on the request of the Department of State it had
despatched by courier the text of the two articles added to the law
by the Council of State and that as soon as an answer came from
the Department of State it would inform the Haitian Government,
and again it renewed its request that the law be not promulgated.
And the Haitian Government has not promulgated the law not-
withstanding the embarrassing position in which it is placed in
meeting the requirements of the Constitution.
3. Pension law
The Civil Pension Law of August 10, 1894, provides by its article
18: "Any citizen who shall have reached the age of 50 years and,
during 25 years at least, performed duty in any one of the legisla-
tive, judicial or executive offices enumerated in the table of the law
of November 19, 1864, will be entitled to a pension on the Public
Treasury."
24 Note of Aug. 21, 192O, from the Haitian Charg6, p. 777.


Go up to Top of Page