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United States Department of State / Papers relating to the foreign relations of the United States, with the annual message of the president transmitted to Congress December 7, 1903
(1903)

Panama,   pp. 689-691 PDF (1.0 MB)


Page 691

 PANAMA. 691 
with an office copy of the letter I bear from the President accrediting me
in such capacity. 
 I beg to request your excellency to be good enough to designate a time at
which I may have the honor to present the original to their excellencies
the members of the junta of the provisional Government of the Republic of
Panama. 
I have, etc., 
WM. 1. BUCHANAN. 
[Inclosure 2.] 
Mr. Buchanan to the minister for foreign affairs. 
PANAMA, December 33, 1903. 
 SIR: I beg to inclose for your excellency's information a copy of the remarks
I shall have the honor to make to their excellencies the members of the junta
of the provisional government upon the occasion of my presenting to their
excellencies my letter of credence from the President of the United States.
I have, etc 
WM. I. BUCHANAN. 
[Subinclosure.] 
Mr. Buchanan's remarks upon presenting his credentials. 
 I have the honor to present to your excellencies the letter of credence
I bear ~from the President of the United States of America accrediting me
as an envoy on special mission to your excellencies' Government. 
 I am deeply sensible of the honor thus conferred upon me by the President
and profoundly grateful for the opportunity I am thus afforded to meet your
excellencies' people and to study the conditions and possibilities of the
Republic of Panama. 
 The advent and the future development and life of this now nation is a subject
of keen and kindly interest to the American people, who all wish for your
excellencies' people and country that wide progress and advancement which
peace, quiet, and economy bring to all countries. 
 I am charged by the President to express to your excellencies his fervent
wish that these benefits shall come to the Republic of Panama, and that happiness,
contentment, and prosperity may abide with your excellencies' people. 
[Inciosure 3.—Translation.] 
Reply,' of Doctor Arango, on behalf of the junta, to Mr. Buchanan's remarks.
 SIR: The junta of the provisional government of the Republic of Panama receives~
from your hands with lively satisfaction the letter of His Excellency the
President of the United States of America which accredits you before this
new nation as envoy especial of your Government. By this the greatest of
the Republics of the continent dignifies its appreciation of the least as
an equal with her sister Republics and gives a manifest proof of the high
spirit of justice which animates the great people of the North, in whose
favor our people extend their best wishes and their best intentions. 
 The junta of the provisional government of the Republic of Panama considers
the selection by the United States Government of one who, like yourself,
unites in himself such marked personal and public qualities as to enable
him to duly appreciate the actual conditions of our country as a high mark
of deference. Your presence in our midst will be the means, if that b&
possible, of more closely linking the two nations together in sincere friendship
and accord. 
 Notwithstanding we know that the people of your country are interested in
the existence and development of this nation, it has been especially grateful
to this junta to hear the fact repeated by the official representative of
a people so great, free, and generous. We pray the Almighty that what you
have said, the benefits of progress, the advancements from pea~e and the
emoluments of order, the harvest the people of Panama aspire to, might he,
if it were possible, as bright as that gathered by your country with marked
advantage for humanity. 
 You can assure His Excellency the President of your nation that the Government
and people of Panama thank him for his good wishes for this Republic, and
that we in return fervently hope that all good may come to his people and
to himself. 


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