University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Foreign Relations of the United States

Page View

United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1952-1954. China and Japan (in two parts)
(1952-1954)

The China area,   pp. 1-1061 ff. PDF (381.2 MB)


Page 6


6           FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1952-1954, VOLUME XIV
                          RECOMMENDATIONS
I. United States Licensing Policy for Hong Kong
  A. Treatment of Rated and/or Short Supply Items on Positive
List and Non-Positive List I-C Items. 3
  1. Rated Items (Items on US. Security Lists)
  a. International List I (including the Munitions List and Atomic
Energy Items)
  Items on International List I, the Munitions List and Atomic
Energy items, which have been embargoed to the Soviet Bloc by
Hong Kong, may be licensed, where supplies are available, to the
extent necessary to meet essential minimum short-term require-
ments in Hong Kong, and for transshipment or resale to meet simi-
lar requirements in non-Soviet bloc destinations, provided ship-
ments to Hong Kong do not involve stockpiling beyond normal re-
quirements, important industrial expansion, or other questionable
security risks.
  b. Items on United States List IA, II, IIB, and IC may be licensed
within the limits of availability, to meet essential minimum short-
term requirements for local consumption in Hong Kong and for
transshipment or resale to meet similar requirements in non-Soviet
bloc destinations, provided shipments do not involve stockpiling
beyond normal requirements, important industrial expansion or
other questionable security risks and, provided the United King-
dom Government agrees to impose or has imposed and maintains
at Hong Kong an embargo on the shipment of these or identical
items to Communist China and North Korea or has explained satis-
factorily why such action cannot be taken. Otherwise export should
be denied unless it is found that the granting of the license would
be of a net security advantage to the United States.
3 The lists under reference were among the lists of items subject to U.S.
export
controls; there were, in addition, three lists of items subject to export
controls by
the countries participating in the Coordinating Committee (COCOM) of the
Paris
Consultative Group of nations working to control export of strategic goods
to Com-
munist countries. International List I consisted of items embargoed to the
Soviet
bloc by the COCOM participants; items on International List II were subject
to
quantitative controls; and items on International List III were subject to
surveil-
lance and exchange of information between the COCOM countries. U.S. Lists
I and
I-A consisted of items which the United States considered of primary strategic
sig-
nificance and embargoed to the Soviet bloc; List I was identical to International
List
I, while List I-A consisted of items embargoed by the United States but not
by all
the COCOM countries. U.S. Lists II and II-B consisted of items of secondary
strate-
gic significance, the export of which was highly restricted; List II included
all items
(except those on U.S. List I-A) on International List II, while II-B included
items
not on International List II. U.S. List I-C included items not on the lists
mentioned
above which might support military activity; their export to the Soviet bloc
was re-
stricted. The Positive List was the official public list issued by the Department
of
Commerce of items, the export of which to all, or most, destinations required
a vali-
dated license issued by the Office of International Trade of the Department
of Com-
merce; it included all the items on the U.S. security lists, except for a
few on the I-
C list, and all items controlled for reasons of short supply.
For documentation concerning general U.S. trade restrictions on the Soviet
bloc
and U.S. participation in COCOM, see vol. i, Part 2, pp. 817 ff.


Go up to Top of Page