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United States Department of State / Foreign relations of the United States, 1951. The Near East and Africa
(1951)

The Near and Middle East: multilateral relations,   pp. 1-342 PDF (132.2 MB)


Page 1


          THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST
UNITED    STATES MILITARY        AND ECONOMIC POLICIES
  WITH RESPECT TO THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST: THE
  DRAFTING AND IMPLEMENTATION OF UNITED STATES
  POLICY TOWARD THE ARAB STATES AND ISRAEL; THE
  CONFERENCE OF MIDDLE EAST CHIEFS OF MISSION
  AT ISTANBUL, FEBRUARY 14-21; THE ORIGINS AND DE-
  VELOPMENT OF PLANS TO ESTABLISH A MIDDLE EAST
  COMMAND
                         Editorial Note
  The Joint Chiefs of Staff, in a memorandum dated August 5, 1948,
to the Secretary of Defense which the latter circulated to the National
Security Council (NSC 19/3; Foreign Relations, 1948, volume III,
page 933) on the subject "Disposition of the Former Italian Colonies
in Africa", stated that, in formulating a statement of the requirements
of the United States with regard to the former Italian Colonies, they
found it necessary to appraise the position and security interests of the
United States not only with respect to those territories, but to the
entire area of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean. The ap-
praisal by the Joint Chiefs of Staff of United States security interests
in the entire area indicated the following strategic requirements:
  a. Denial to any potentially hostile power of any foothold in this
  area.
  b. Maintenance of friendly relationships which could be promoted
  by social and economic assistance, together with such military assist-
  ance as might be practicable in order to insure collaboration by the
  peoples of the region in the common defense of the area.
  c. Development of the oil resources in the area by the United States
  and such other countries as had or could be expected to have a friendly
  attitude toward the United States.
  d. Assurance of the right of military forces of the United States
  to enter militarily essential areas upon a threat of war.
  e. Assurance of the right to develop and maintain those facilities
which were required to implement d (Memorandum by Secretary of
Defense Forrestal for the Executive Secretary, National Security
Council, 2 August, 1948, S/P-NSC Files: Lot 61 D 167: "Eastern
Mediterranean and Middle East").
   For previous documentation on United States policy regarding this region,
see
 Foreign Relations, 1950, vol. v, pp. 1 ff. Policy respecting Greece and
Turkey in
 1951 is largely treated in context of the NATO Pact in vol. in, pt. 1, pp.
460 ff.
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